Tuesday, March 1, 2016

TED Talks & Culture: Commentary Assignment post by 7 am






Video 1        Video 2        Video 3        Video 4        Video 5


Write a commentary on the video based on the following:

*Perspective Readings
*Big Ideas from Chapter 1
The Arrival
*Other IB Classes
*Pose a possible knowledge question

There is a word limit when posting
Always review the rubric!
Anonymous~1st Name Only and then your post






35 comments:

  1. Hannah
    I really enjoyed the TED talk given by Thandie Newton as I was able to relate and connect many thoughts and ideas from it. The theme “embracing others” automatically drew my mind to the ideas from chapter 1 and the article 3 perspective reading. Chapter 1 discussed a great deal of entering a perspective different than our own and allowing these perspectives to surpass simply what we think we know from stereotypes. This then connected to the perspective reading as it reminded me of the way the narrator described the embracing her family performed towards the so called, “outsider” that came from another country. Newton then went on to discuss the meaning of even embracing others to say that in order to do so, one must embrace themselves. She asked a question that stood out to me and allowed me to think back on an interactive oral we had in literature last week. She said, “But the self is a projection based on other people’s projections. Is it who we really are, or who we really want to be, or should be?” In the interactive oral we discussed how one’s interaction and communication with others can truly shape their way of life and who they are. Some argued that whether you communicate with a person or not, this factor does not shape who you are and the way you act. However, I and a few others argued contradictory to this, stating that some people act differently around others possibly because they act how they think others want them to act. Newton’s points on how she personally felt out of place as a child due to her ethnicity and history then allowed me to make a connection with biology. She mentioned how it was very uncommon for people to see a mixed child in the day and age she was growing up, and I thought back to the point where we discussed the correlation between poverty and genetics. I wondered if it were at all possible that because of the color of her skin and texture of her hair, this would interfere with the opportunities she received. It is clear that this was not the case as she is a very successful woman; however the thought of any possibilities still lingered in my mind. Another connection I drew included the point in which she described her dancing and acting allowing her to basically block everyone around her out and feel like she “lost herself.” This drew me to think of “The Arrival” and how the same paper bird always appeared somewhere in the book, even in places you would least expect it. As my partner and I continued to see it we began to think that maybe this bird had some sort of internal significance to the character, making him feel as if he can use this bird to block out the world around him just as Newton felt about her talents.
    Possible knowledge question: How does one’s daily communication with others affect what they know and who they are as a person?

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  2. This video discusses a photographer's experiences with endangered cultures. A reason was given for why cultures become endangered is because with each generation the language that the people use changes. I see this with” my parents when they don't understand what I mean when I use certain “slang” words. This language that changes also includes cultural sayings. Many times there are references that only people from a certain era can understand. I see this alot when I watch shows from another era or shows that took place in another area. I once was watching a show and they referenced the OJ Simpson trial I didn't realize this until my mother pointed it out for me. Eventually there won't be any people from this era alive anymore and these references will die with them.
    This video also reminded me of how much perspectives affect our views and knowledge of things. In the video there was a Colombian tribe that had to move 3 times because of an oil spill. This oil spill changed their ways of lives and forced them to relocate from an area that was native to them. But as he points out, often times people in the US never hear about it. In the perspective readings there was a tragedy going on in Pakistan but since it didn't effect the US major news outlets didn't cover it. If the girl’s parents weren't from Pakistan she wouldn't have any knowledge of the turmoil that was going on in that area of the world because no one in the US was talking about it. Living in the US sometimes allows me to be able to ignore issues that don't concern my country or the people around me. In Biology we discussed how the Zika virus only became an interest of the US when it began to threaten the country. But diseases that had much more effects such as malaria and West Nile are not even discussed because they don't threaten the US. When people here were polled it was found that we had the 2nd worst geographical knowledge in the world. Young people from the US couldn't name the locations of some important countries and oceans. To avoid this the Borges took his son to Pakistan so that he could see people who are culturally different from him with their living standards and religion. There he saw the typical way that the shaman practices his religion and it was strange to him much like it would be strange to most people from the US. For someone practicing their religion to appear strange to someone of a different culture It shows the importance of being exposed to different cultures and ways people have of living. In the readings she explained how she was only taught about and exposed to American history and issues. This makes it much harder to be used to and accepting of different cultures if you don't know about them or how to actually respect them.
    Aakilah B

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  3. Sabeena Khan
    The broad definition of culture is a system of behavior that helps us act in an accepted or familiar way. We are most likely acting in ways that are accepted and familiar in our culture without even realizing it. For example, hand gestures, conversations, body language, driving habits, etc. These aspects differ depending on which culture you are surrounded by. Different cultures have a different way of doing things that are familiar to them and see other cultures as how they want to see them. They want to characterize them in a way that is familiar to them .For example, in History of the Americas class we are studying WW2. During this time The U.S and Japan declared war on each other. The Japanese believed Americans to be "soft" and didn't think that the U.S. could do much in war and felt confident that they could defeat us. However, they were mistaken and the U.S. put up a fair fight. The Japanese felt familiar calling us soft because they believed that their samurai ways of fighting was superior to any nation and that the U.S. was only a nation that played baseball and ate pies. Being exposed to one way of familiar thinking makes us misperceive a lot of things about other cultures. This is why developing a global perspective is important. In order to develop a global perspective we must be open to new ideas, issues and solutions. This allows us to change/merge different ways of thinking and doing things until we find a new system that works better for us.
    The key part of developing a global perspective is understanding why different cultures have specific values. For example my parents are from Pakistan and India where there is little limitations when driving. So sometimes they disregard little rules when on the road such as speed limits or lanes. Where as here, the familiar and accepted things to do is to follow all the rules. Although my parents have been here for over twenty years and have been accustomed to American culture, they still keep some aspects from where they're from because this is what they were used to for most of their lives. However, they are aware of the consequences that occur here if rules are broken so they still follow most rules and are cautious on the road because in the United states, laws are more enforced and the citizens are more willing to follow the rules. Whereas in South Asia there isn't as many laws or rules. This is probably because they only recently developed their own democracy since it was formerly colonized. My parents understand and practice different aspects from each of their cultures. This is what is called having a global perspective, being able to understand and link our own lives to the lives of others throughout the world. In order to have a global perspective one must develop their knowledge on different cultures and fully understand the values behind certain customs and actions. For example, when I went to Pakistan, hospitality was a huge part of the culture, as opposed to here where we don't normally value hospitality that much. This was unfamiliar to me so I started questioning as to why it was more important over there. I came to the conclusion that it was because of the tenants that each culture is based on. The United States is based on individualism where as in South Asia it is all about community and the collective conscious. So naturally being social and hospitable is what is familiar and accepted there and which is a value that I cherish and really am fond of. This is why I value this cultural aspect and incorporate it in my life here. This is an example of developing a global perspective.

    How is identity significant when developing a global perspective?

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  4. Sabeena Khan continued...
    Cultural communication is also present in The arrival because in the story it is visible that a group of people came to a place that is culturally different than what they are comfortable with. In order to communicate with each other the man used a lot of hand gestures to explain his situation and get his message across. This form of communication made it so that language was no longer a border prohibiting them from understanding each other. The man also took in his new environment and tried his best to understand his surroundings.

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  5. During the video, there were several interesting points stated by the speaker, Phil Borges. The first was the teaching by the Delai Lama which states,“treat your enemies as if they were precious jewels because it's your enemies that builds your tolerance and patience on the road to your enlightenment”.
    This teaching was addressed to monks who were thrown in prison for various reasons and were badly treated. Because of this, I wondered, how could someone not want revenge or wish bad things for the people that ill-treated them but instead show them kindness? As this came to mind, I also took in consideration that monks are from a non violent culture and in contrast to my perspective reading (about the Jewish boy who tried to fit in with society but lost his culture as a result), these monks are not trying to adapt to the vengeful world we now live in. Instead, they are embracing their own culture. However, cultural perspectives are able to be altered because of society’s impact. Tibetans are non-violent people even when their country was invaded and there was a plot to kill the leader of their country. In history class, this situation was portrayed during WWII when the Japanese tried to seize numerous countries, however, the Japanese faced resistance because the countries’ inhabitants were willing to fight for their homes. We see this as patriotism and as a good thing but from the Tibetans’ perspective non-violence is the best response. This does not mean that these violent actions by other countries does not have any impact on them. In fact, the younger generation of Tibetans now think that non violence doesn't work and violence is a political tool. This shows society's impact on cultures and how cultures are altered through generations. Additionally, as stated in the chapter readings, maps are “images not just of our planet but of the way that we think about our planet”. The Huaorani tribe’s map sees the planet as a natural environment instead of an industrial one. They use spears and blowguns instead of guns and bombs to defend their territory from oil workers. The speaker went on a hunt with them and realized how in tuned they were with the environment. They could see, hear and smell things that he couldn't. Similar to the speaker, in The Arrival, the main character goes on a journey to a place he is unfamiliar with and as a result he is unable to navigate or find what he is looking for, he is out of tune with his environment.
    KQ: The speaker states that getting kids accustomed to different realities is very important but what role does a person’s cross-cultural experience play on their perspective?

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  6. Ethel https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dibuTkrRFy4Yx1_Z948I1jPh0y73UkxaiKhT2WBVzWw/edit

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  7. Yared
    Jimmy Nelson started his discussion by talking about his experience in Southern Ethiopia. He wanted to take a tree picture, but he did not do it correctly on the first try. He said the first picture failed because he did not understand the culture of the people. This brings me back to the chapter readings because it discussed about internal and external cultural differences. Nelson understand there is an external cultural difference (which is the reason he decided to go to a different country at the first place), but he did not understand the internal differences or similarities. One example is the two women that fought because of the fought because of their misplacement. When he was taking the picture, he did not take a moment to realize their personality or role in the society. It took him a week to figure it out, but once he did, he was able to communicate with the people and take a beautiful picture.
    Nelson went further and started to explain what he wanted the audience to learn from his experience. He said, it would be easier to talk about himself because that is the only person he knows well from the entire group. He did say he does not know everything, but this experience gave him a better understanding. This is similar to Olga Hubard (perspective reading) because she was trying to discover herself through the experience of others. She interviewed all those people to compare her life in New York in contrast with Mexico, but ultimately, this was a self-discovering experience for her, the same way Nelson found himself in this journey. Nora (A Doll’s House) can relate because she left her family to go on a different journey that had the same purpose. she was trying to discover herself just like Nelson and Hubard, but with a different method that isn't mentioned in the play.
    On his new journey, Nelson did not make the same mistake because he tried to understand the Huli (the next people he looked at) before taking a picture of them. This allowed him to learn more about them, which, in turn, allowed him to learn more about himself. This lesson was to find a ritual that will work for him and reflect back to his past to find where he fits. This was the goal Professor Hubard tried to achieve as well, because her logic behind this experiment is to gain a better understanding of other people, to find answers about her own.
    Nelson then went to Siberia to understand the meaning of beauty. This, again, was another self-discovery because he wanted to understand if he was considered beautiful. The people in Siberia did not want him to take a picture of them, without getting to know them; so he decided to stay for a few weeks, and he observed the close relationship between the children and the elderly. That helped him understand what beauty was, but my question here is how? How did he learn about beauty by looking at the close relationship between the elderly and the young? My assumption is, the fact the children did not care about looks, when helping the elderly. He said they were not judgmental, so this bring us back to the saying “beauty is in the inside.”

    What is the role of age, when observing beauty?

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  8. Priscilla
    Video 1
    The video basically talks about the cultures that on one really knows about in these days. The speaker Phil Borges goes to different countries and cities with “endangered cultures”, he interviews them and takes photographs. There are some places he mentioned that I didn’t know about until he talked about it like Tibet, Himalayas and Lhasa so I was thinking about it and I remembered the activity in chapter 1 about drawing our own map and I realized if I were to draw my map right now, I wouldn’t know where to put these places and it might because I don’t experience different cultures. He also talks about the fact from MIT that explained how our culture diversity is dividing into half in every generation and I agree with it. It seems like every culture is becoming the same now, with technologies etc, especially when he talked about one of his student living in the arctic village in Alaska with no running water, heat but has a very strong Wi-Fi. Borges mentioned that he took his son to Pakistan so he could witness how people who lived on a dollar a day or less and this is something we talked about in class last week, experiencing other cultures prevents one from being single minded. I wouldn’t know most of what I know right now if it wasn’t because of my change of scenery. One thing I found very interesting was this study that he talked about, it was a study of 18 to 26 year olds in the US and nine other industrialized country and the US came in second to last in geographic knowledge; 70 percent couldn’t find Afghanistan or Iraq on the map. This reminds me of my perspective reading “When Mr. Pirzada came to dine” and also this discussion in biology class. In my reading the weren’t involved in India even when they had a civil war going on, because it didn’t affect us, we were oblivious it to. We had a similar discussion in biology class, where we were talking about the Zika virus and how the United States is only invested in it because “it’s practically knocking on their back door”. Ms Siebert talked about how malaria has been in Africa for ages but nothing has been done about it but since the Zika virus is in South America, we are trying to find a cure for it. It’s really sad on how we live in our own bubble, we don’t know anything about other countries but we expect them to know everything about us.

    KQ: How far does ethics influence the beliefs of people and their point of views?

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  9. Ethel
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dibuTkrRFy4Yx1_Z948I1jPh0y73UkxaiKhT2WBVzWw/edit

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  10. Can the change of a "language" in each generation have positives, in it could come with the elimination of prejudicial or racist terms?

    Aakilah B

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  11. Bintou
    I am very sad that many cultures all over the world are disappearing. In the talk, many political and environmental factors have contributed to the declines in these endangered cultures. It seems that the cultures are adapted to the environment they are in and now they are barely trying to adapt these challenges. It was pretty nice for Phil Bores to take pictures of the Himalayan monks and of the Huaorani tribe in the Ecuadorian Amazon and sharing their knowledge through the internet. The photographer is valuing their cultural perspectives as an important part in keeping the culture alive. The speaker also mentions the issues of disappearing languages of which we won’t understand of it anymore. It seems hard to understand languages like the man in The Arrival. The audience in the video also seems to understand the languages spoken in the video he showed just like what the man did in the novel. A knowledge question I would ask on this is how does the speaker photos’ shows his cultural perspectives on the tribes?

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  12. Shania
    Video 3
    Throughout the video I noticed that the speaker Pellegrino Riccardi continued to bring up the words “accepted and familiar”, he would draw examples from different encounters where two cultures clashed and based the reaction off of the standard known by every culture which is being able to relate based on what is “accepted and familiar”. This revelation connects to perspective because it basically shows reasons for why we view things the way we do. For example in the video he talked about how Italians talk when they are eating at the table and how Finns can but do not have to. Riccardi later gave reference to an occasion where the two cultures clashed and the reaction of the Finn not wanting to engaged in the conversation , was a result to being exposed to something that wasn’t “accepted and familiar”, to the Finn’s own culture. That is where perception comes in, based on the video I now understand that not only do we have to be aware about the differences in the culture, but we have to recognize other people’s perspectives. Just like in the first Chapter of TOK we should take into consideration how culture can influence your knowledge. Now with the connection to the video we see that this knowledge influenced by culture creates this standard of what is “accepted and familiar”, in that particular culture. In IB World Literature we discuss racial issues and standards between the Caucasian race and the African American race. This connects to this “accepted and familiar” concept because in the average Caucasian person’s culture someone with kinky curly hair is rare to find. This leads to another topic the speaker addresses, which basically talks about the fact that when one is exposed to a culture relatively different from theirs, they can become curious and intrigued or uncomfortable. This uncomfortable feeling is evident in the history between African Americans and Caucasian people, because during the Harlem renaissance or before the civil rights movement African Americans were seen as unusual because they were still not used to presence of a person that had a darker skin color along with other traits that differed in comparison and just like Riccardi states in the video when your uncomfortable it can lead to negative conclusions. Hence the reason for discrimination, apartheid and things of that nature, of course it is a drastic negative conclusion, but still very evident. When reading “The Arrival’, by Shaun Tan you see a series of images of a man coming into a new land and culture. Because this book is a book with no words every picture can be perceived differently depending on the reader’s cultures. For instance I know that in some Asian cultures like the Japanese they read their Manga (picture book) backwards because that is what is “accepted and familiar”, to them Therefore just taking that into perspective shows how the book can be completely switched around and interpreted completely different from the artist’s intent because the scope in which the readers are viewing it is based on the standard that was developed by the their culture and the, knowledge they know about culture, because all these factors pull together to help a person decide whether or not a given topic such as food from Germany is “accepted or familiar”, and the reaction is also very significant. The reaction to culture can show your perspective, shine light on your knowledge, and show how your culture influenced your reaction.

    Knowledge Question: Can Your Way Of Knowing something culturally affect your ability to be open- minded? If you see something as "accepted and familiar" based on your Knowledge how could curiosity help you to stray from the given standard of something having to be "accepted and familiar?

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  13. Emonee
    While watching video 2, I was able to understand the meaning of culture. Pellegrino Riccardi stated the definition of culture meaning “ a system of behaviour that helps us act in a accepted and familiar way. During the video he brought up points about body language, communication, behavior, stereotypes, the different beliefs and perceptions being influenced by our culture of what is “accepted and familiar.” Culture does contribute to the different perceptions that we may have towards other cultures. For example, from the perspective reading assignment, there were the views on life from thee different people that spent most of their lives in Mexico and moved to New York. The perception Jacinta moving to New York was different. She had a harder time adjusting because of the social structure being more easy going when it came to interesting new people in New York. She found that the culture in New York was odd because it was not what she was use to. When she lived in Mexico, they had a certain way of interacting with one another in their specific circles. So her culture of having an enforced social structure influenced her perception and expectations of the social structure of New York. That connected with the video because of the idea of how people do things that are accepted in their particular social group and which is familiar for them. In the graphic novel The Arrival, the pictures were showing how the man left his family and moved to this new place. He had a to live in a new place and came across an unusual pet and his intentions were to immediately attack it. But as days had gone by, he saw that the unusual animal was actually a very common pet in that particular culture. The origami and abnormal shaped figures were actually symbolic to them. So when he moved into this new setting, his misperceptions from his old culture and what he is use to had to be adjusted in order to fit into his new surroundings. I am able to understand the reasons behind the way some people behave and their body language being a certain way because they have to adjust to their surroundings. Living in different places you have to be aware of the major differences between the norm for you and the norm for that other country. As Riccardi stated in the video,”Working across borders is basically not accepting completely that your assumptions are the assumptions of others.” Basically, people see what they want to see. For example, in my IB lit class, as a class we are reading a poem about a eight year old boy being called a “nigger” in Baltimore. We interpreted that he was from the north or a place that wasn't heavily segregated because when he saw the other little boy, he smiled expecting to get a positive reaction back but instead he was called a “nigger”. His perception of a little boy his age in a different state was not what he expected because maybe that particular place and certain time was surrounded by the stereotypes of a black man. It ties in with culture because of the time period of when people accepted and were familiar of the way african americans were treated. Overall, the different cultures have their own way of thinking, what they accept and what they are familiar with.

    What role does the misperceptions play on understanding someone’s culture?

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  14. I found the video very insightful and informative about many things I myself have never considered. The video starts with an opening comment about a fact discovered by Ken Hale at MIT that found that of the world's 6,000 languages 3,000 of them aren't spoken by the children of the family thus halving our cultural diversity. To start, I found this fact very shocking considering it brings to the forefront a disconnect between generations of people from the same culture. I see language as something that is very special and sacred. Language is a way of communication and there is so many different types which makes each and every group unique. The idea that half of these languages are not being passed on from generation to generation shows that there is a generational disconnect. In spanish we talked about different generations and how there are a lot of differences between them. For example your parents idea of courtship might be completely different from yours. The ideas, values and overall goals of different generations also creates differences between the two. Now from this video it is evident that there is also a language barrier as well between generations. There children who might grow up in a spanish speaking household but never learn how to speak the language but only understand it.

    This idea of lack of cultural diversity also made me think about biology and our discussion on genetic variation. Cultural diversity is very important because it is what makes our world different with many different groups being represented and coexisting together. The importance of cultural diversity in the world is the same as the need for genetic variation in the body. Human beings need to be genetically diverse to advance the human race and create immunes or protections from certain diseases. For example if an interracial couple (African American and Caucasian) were to have a child and the African American parent was a carrier of the sickle cell trait then the child could also be born with that trait. The trait which is very dominate in African Americans immunes the carrier from malaria. This type of genetic variation would cause certain protections to many different diseases. This is similar to cultural diversity because if the world was not culturally diverse there would only be certain cultural groups in the world, something that does not add to the expansion of ideas or different ways of life.


    Another big idea in the video was about a study done by Discovery. Discovery conducted a study that found that out on 9 countries America was second to last in geographic knowledge. 70% of our children couldn’t find Afghanistan or Iraq. 60% couldn’t identify India and 30% of students couldn't identify the Pacific ocean. I found this very sad but I was not shocked by the findings. This idea about our perception of the world was something I wrote a lot about in the Chapter 1 reading. In Chapter one there is a section on your own map and how you would perceive the world. There were some examples of other students but it was consistent throughout that most people drew vague pictures of the part or the world they were not from. This shows how where we live affects our perception of the world and how much care or time we put into getting to understand the rest of the world. The video made me consider American children as a whole. If we struggle so much with identifying the geography of the world what does this say about our openness to other cultures or our relation to the rest of the world?

    Jasmine
    Part 1 of 2

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  15. The video center around culture particularly indigenous cultures. It talked about the way of life of many different people from different parts of the world. I found this interesting because I had not heard of a lot of these tribes or indigenous groups before. I liked how the video brought up the importance of of kids understanding the realities of others and understanding that other cultures do not live like they do. I found it very unique that his son who is around my age is able to experience some of these culture first hand. I noticed my own bias in the video when he was talking about the tribal group outside of Pakistan performing ceremony where they burned leaves and sacrificed the blood of an animal. My initial thoughts were that there was no need for the sacrifice of an animal but I soon realized that this is something that was apart of their culture and that I had no place to judge this practice. This video had the idea of bringing openness to other people's way of life; something I think was brought out in the Arrival. In the Arrival the main character travels off to this unusual world where everything seems to be weird. There are pets mixed with different types of animals, a new language and flying boats. Initially the main character was frightened confused and seemed uncomfortable in his new setting but over time he realized that they were still regular humans that he could relate to in some way. This story brings the idea of acceptance of culture and having an open mind to other people's ways; something I think the video reflected very well.


    Something I notice in the video while he was explaining and elaborating on the different cultures was that a lot of the leaders of the tribes tended to be male Many people consider tribal life uncivilized because their way of life is different from m
    ore developed areas but I wondered are they really any different. I saw a lot of the leaders male, something I see still today in these so called more “civilized” areas like the United States. In the perspective reading the people from Mexico also stated that back in Mexico they were housewives and their husbands were seen as the head of the house. I feel like almost everywhere in society rather it be in Mexico the United States or tribal areas across the world still utilize this idea of a male dominated society and I still wonder why that is. I would love to learn more about a civilization where women are dominate and are the head of the household.

    Knowledge Question: In what ways can member of society gain knowledge on others cultures and become tolerant of their ways of life?

    Jasmine
    Part 2 of 2

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  16. Alexander
    The redemption of culture by preserving it, more like the safeguard to ensure a diversity globe is mentioned in the Wade Davis Ted Talk, “Dreams from Endangered Cultures.” What I mean by this, is that the cultures, such as those shown in the Amazon are shown to have ways of gaining knowledge which are unorthodox to other cultures. By having plants talk to them, is a way in which they categorize their plants. This is the first time I’ve heard of such a thing. In Chapter 1, the theories presented show us how a culture works and changes. In this case, the way in which this people live seem to be all categorized by their harmony towards the environment. Is it because their environment directly affects whether they live or die. For example, a storm would not prevent me from eating, but in a culture that is agricultural, a storm can destroy crops, and houses. In a sort of way, nature is a master of them, and we are beginning to become on level with nature. In history class, we learned that the place in which one settles decides whether one becomes a civilization or not. Here we see many tribes like the Inuit, becoming nomads due to their environments, however what the video and other examples have shown me is that humans are very adaptable. For example, many survivors, pioneers of the Gold Rush have done the unimaginable to survive, including one case where cannibalism was performed. Are all cultures about survival, or is it the biology that is wired into us? In Biology, we learned that all living organism have seven functions, which are done to ensure survival and reproduction. In the Arrival, a father seems to go to a completely new place to not only himself survive but his family as well. This not only shows the need to live, but the need to thrive as well. In “The Red Convertible” the need to survive finally wears off on the brother’s protagonist. By losing the will to live, he acknowledges what all living things must do and that is die. But is culture and knowledge subject to the same fate? The way in which knowledge is preserved can become in fact erroneous to those to which it belongs. For example, by preserving the geography of New Zealand without its native names would be paramount to not preserving it at all. By knowing rituals but not understanding them could make them meaningless and actually wrong when stored at face value. Therefore, it’s also how knowledge is stored and kept that also matters. As shown in “The Red Convertible”, storing it in memory is a lost cause, but memory and stored knowledge, what has happened, can change when looked back upon. For example, the protagonist takes a photography, only to change his feeling towards it. What this implies is that it’s impossible to sometimes know what is actually there, at a more than physical level, when emotion cannot be stored in these methods, and even if it is, the emotion conveyed 400 years ago in a painting will be much different than that trying to be conveyed or that which was conveyed 400 years ago. In conclusion, the survival of people and culture go hand in hand, but culture can only be preserved as a collective effort, not always to be diverse, but to understand, and all must be done to ensure the context and emotion can remain. But even then it is not assured, but it is better to try than not. From the video and looking back at all the materials I’ve learned that the way in which culture can fade is fascinating. However, I know that there will be some culture and knowledge that we will never be able to store. “Why must we store their knowledge if it has no application to our society?” some may ask, but I feel that all knowledge must be taken into account in order to establish a more global society. Instead of looking for applications of knowledge, sometimes knowledge, I feel, can be learned just for the sake of it, and that our knowledge and out advanced capabilities with it distinguishes us from other species.
    What role does the format in which knowledge is stored play in developing its interpretations?

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  17. Camiellalouisa,
    The definition of self is, " a person's essential being that distinguishes them from others". Keyword distinguishes, I take that to mean we are meant to be different even though we try to be the same. Ms. Newton expressed growing up feeling like a pariah because she was the only mixed atheist child in an all white Catholic school. She grew up in the 1970s in England it's certain that she was not accepted. When I hear Catholic, my immediate thought is strict and religious so a child who did not believe in the religion that dominated her surroundings and on top of that had to deal with racial discrimination for having a different skin color is disheartening. I think this is what drove her to act, she was not trying to accept herself but escape it, through acting she would play the part of someone who her opposite, this is not how one learns to love thyself but to loathe even more. Thinking on this with a futuristic mindset, my first thought was why not embrace your difference from the start, be a breath of fresh air in a vanilla world. But then I realize I do the same thing. It may not be about race and being different as I am surrounded by color and we embrace differences in my community. I do the same in the sense that I feel "different", my person is not the concept of beauty in today's society, it makes me feel awkward like Ms. Newton; our battles, are not on the same level but we both let ourselves make those worries priority. Ms.Newton explained that we all evolved from mitochondrial Eve, I believe we come from the biblical Eve, created by God. I realize this is religion influencing my 'Areas of Knowledge", it is what I was taught by my parents, I have accepted it, studied it in doctrine, and now live by it, just like how she lives by hers, it may not be the same idea but it stems from the same place our religions/spiritual knowledge.
    We have let self dictate our lives. Ms.Newton explained we have made ourselves accept industrialism and profiting as living, but instead, we should learn to live as one with the world, not just each other, from other humans to the grass on the ground; this will not only involve heart but mind as well. In order to achieve this, we will need to lose our self, the one that makes us prejudiced and instead become like an infant; believing in the whole. This view reminds me of a book we are reading in World Literature called " The Invisible Man". I.M felt he was invisible because no one cared for him as a person, just saw him as one of color no personality or purpose. Ms.Newton felt selfless because she wasn't like those around her she too was of color. They both seem to want the same things, for people to be aware, be aware of those around them, be aware of the environment in which they inhabit, be aware of who they are because only in doing so will we learn to be connected and live in peace.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Camiellalouisa,
    All these points connect to one simple thing, understanding each other, everyone just wants to be understood, acceptance will follow naturally. In Chapter one of TOK, we talked about acknowledging perspectives, trying to interpret things from the view of another in order to fully understand them as a person and coincide with them in harmony. My first thought was it would be impossible for a catholic nun to accept the view of an Atheist especially in the 1970s, the way I picture religious schools is, "my way or the highway", I don't think they would take their time to try and look into a girl's life and all the factors that contribute to her person to try and figure out how did she become this way? I hear talk of tolerance as a way to solve the world's problems but sometimes that is confused with ignorance, a man who lives in uniformity and a closed off neighborhood can preach of being tolerant when in reality they only know of things similar to theirs. The fact that a child was thrown down a road of loneliness and possibly depression all because people simply refuse to accept and acknowledge one another's perspectives and differences no matter how radical or rigid, shows just how disconnected the world is. In the video Ms.Newton mentioned she could feel the pains of others and I took that as another part of understanding other perspectives, we should be empathetic towards each other it will help us feel more connected; feeling one's pain can help us build that person up, feeling one's joy we can all celebrate together and stop trying to change.
    Ms. Newton's experience of being the only one different leading to self-scrutiny and that of society reminded me of 'The Arrival', in this picture novel the father, travels to a new land where he is different from all the others and because of this he was judged. As soon as he stepped foot on the land the people judged him based on their own standards with disregard to his own culture and put an "X" on his shirt meaning he was not up to par. Both of these people I felt were judged by society's blind eye and deemed unworthy.


    KQ: How far can we trust something as fact if there is a sense of culture, religion and many other factors in there that differ based on person?

    ReplyDelete
  19. Remi
    This TEDTalk video spoken by Thandie Newton was about embracing otherness leads to embracing yourself. While listening to this video, a lot of connections were going through my head. Some connections include how in the beginning of her speaking, she talked about how she felt left out since of her skin color. I connected this with my perspective reading So Much Depends. Thandie Newton and the latino girl in the reading were very similar. They both felt isolated and want to feel apart of something. They then realized that being themselves is more important and learning to embrace it and make a difference within others. In chapter one it discusses how people build their knowledge from when they were born surrounded by shaping factors such as their families and their communities. Thandie Newton described race as being apart of a skin color which is in the context of biology and genetics. But her interviewer told her she was wrong since the people with the same skin color do not have the same genetics. This shows how since the people that she surrounded herself when she was younger influenced her to believe that race is defined by skin color. Also in chapter one it says how culture affects what we consider to be important knowledge. As Thandie Newton was saying, we having our iPhones, iPads, and other electronics that we don’t pay attention to the events that are occurring in Cambodia or other countries that are not as well developed as the United States. As Thandie was talking about her childhood and being an anomaly and being rejected I connected this to the Arrival because once he got the city and he didn’t know the language he felt alone just like Thandie Newton. I also connected of how she felt being an anomaly to the book we are reading in english class called the Invisible Man. I connected this to the Invisible Man because I think what makes him invisible is him being African American. So when Thandie Newton talked about how her mother was from Zimbabwe and her dad was from England making her become a brown skinned baby, and how she grew up being the “black atheist” and an “anomaly” I felt as though the Invisible Man would feel the same way or consider her invisible due to her skin color.

    What role does someone’s prior knowledge affect their ability to embrace otherness?

    ReplyDelete
  20. Jefferson
    The speaker, Thandie Newton, talks about the concept of self and how others perceive us. She starts of by describing the emergence of our self and how other people’s perception goes towards us building ourselves. Chapter 1 of the TOK textbook talks about culture and under the subheading “What is “culture?” the author talks about the idea of how we build our knowledge from birth and how these knowledges are often shaped by our family and the people around us. Well both this section and the speaker addresses the certain predicaments that surface when we begin to interact with the social world and we are rejected. This tends to lead to complexities because the person often feels like they do not fit. She later brings the race factor into her speech by addressing our existence and how all humans emerged. From my previous science classes and one of the chapters in the IB Biology book we’ve learned that our color is determined by the amount of melanin it contains but the speaker attributes the idealism of race to us being “scared and ignorant.” She states that from her experiences with a professor from a former University, she learned that there’s more genetic difference in a black Kenyan and black Ugandan than there is in a black Kenyan and a white Norwegian. Identifying one’s self as solely based on race is inaccurate because “race no basis” and we all stem from Africa. The idea of self is just a delusion that our brains create, she claims that oneness is the only way to give ourselves the “ultimate and infinite connections.” During her role acting in the movies she played the characters perfectly and that was due to the fact that she didn’t have a self to intervene and that’s when she realized that self is just a projection of who you really are who you want to be and that technology and is just a way of distancing ourselves. The speaker’s main motive behind her speech was to find what she calls “self” and as we can see in the Arrival, the character starts of by packing and leaving his current area with his family, in connection with the speech I feel like in some sense she is addressing the same issue. She’s indirectly asking us to pause and examine our current lifestyle and see if we are happy. We shouldn’t be content with societal perceptions but instead how we perceive our self. In the book the character is introduced to strange creatures and unfamiliar objects that set as a barrier to him finding employment just like Newton talks about technology being a drawback.

    Question: How does the speaker’s choice of words influence the viewers’ perception oneness?

    ReplyDelete
  21. Efuetngu
    The TED talk provided a very interesting perspective on the idea of one’s self. The point brought up about how we’re brought into this world with a good sense of oneness, which is quickly turned into separateness is seemingly true. Before things like our ‘race’, culture and where we belong are brought to our attention, we do not feel divided. Thandie Newton mentioned that when she was younger, she couldn’t find her concept of self and where she belonged, which led her to desire to disappear at times. This was because of her different racial background from those around her. I feel like this can relate back to “The Invisible Man”, as they both deal with race and the concept of oneself. The reason the invisible man feels invisible might very well be because of his view on himself and his desire to be invisible, like the Mrs. Newton’s old desire to disappear. One of the ideas drawn from the Red Convertible was that by living in the moment, we gain more understanding of our culture. This goes along with the video, but the video expresses the idea that by living in the moment, we lose our understanding of self. Thandie Newton explained that while she was dancing or acting, she’d lose her concept of sense. Putting your all into things such as acting and dancing is living in the moment. She let go of all the insecurities about herself packed into her head by society. Chapter one discussed how we must look at things through another person’s eyes to understand their cultural perspective. This was also mentioned in the TED talk. As Thandie Newton got out and engaged with another culture, she gained more understanding of their perspective. This way we’re being brought closer together instead of further apart. I agree that our modern technology can sometimes cause a disconnection between ourselves and everybody else. Another big idea from the perspective readings was that modernization leads to our understanding of our own culture. This is true in the context of that story because their convertible led them to experience nature, (which was very important to their Native American culture) in a different way. In the context of cell phones, ipods, and other expensive gadgets though, this might not be true. As Thandie Newton explained, we might get too caught up in ourselves because of this technology that we lose connection to others. They might help one gain an understanding of their culture and could help connect them to other cultures, but it all depends on how it’s used. What she was describing, however, was us getting too full of ourselves due to these material possession, which does happen. Instead of using them as a way of connecting with others, we use them as a way to hide away and remain in our little niche. In the video, it is mentioned that there’s no such thing as race and it’s just a man made construct that divides us. This reminds me of Hitler trying to create ‘the master race’(because he felt his was superior) by going through extreme measures, which was mentioned before in History class. This shows how people use race to divide us. The video also mentions that we should honor death of self, appreciate life and become aware of the world. This reminds me of the ending to the Stranger. In the end, Meursault let go of all thoughts he had on life, became aware of how life works, which lead him to be feel free, appreciate life and take in all that it offers.

    Knowledge Question: How does the creator of a work intentions’ affect how it is interpreted by the viewers?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Beltine

    Pellegrino Riccardi of speaks of being multicultural cultural as he comes from both an English and Italian background, Norway and Italy. He speaks of his personal and professional experience about how to be accepting of different cultures and perceptions. As an expert of cross culture, Pellegrino speaks of stereotypes and generalization he has come across having to do with Italians or Norwegian. As I listened to him speak, I was able to make connections to make connections to my experiences as an immigrant, things I have learned from reading the first chapter of "The Arrival", and what I learned in some of my IB classes.
    As an Immigrant, when I first got to America I noticed that many people had a certain generalization of Africans. According to them, all Africans are poor, they can't speak English and they come from shabby homes. The assumptions they made prevented them from exposing themselves to a different culture. They lacked acceptance and could not adapt to having someone different, someone unfamiliar to their ways around them. I had to be the one to change my ways just to fit in with the norms. The norms which where braiding my hair, speaking "American" English and changing my style of dressing to match theirs. Just like the speaker I too had to adapt to two cultures making sure that one does not outweigh the other. People have to keep away from misperceptions and they to be more open minded about the world we live in.
    In chapter one of "The Arrival", the man struggled with the new place he was in, he noticed that it was very different from where he came from. Because it was so different from where he came from, he had a different perception of things. He had to come to terms that everyone no matter where you are from have your own perception of things. He also had to realize that they only way to remain understanding and accepting of difference is through open mindedness and willingness in trying to understand cultures you are unfamiliar with. Pellegrino only became familiar with his two cultures because he was curious and had the willingness and open mindedness to learn. I on the other hand, was willing to learn the America but was forced to learn it quickly because I was a child and wanted so much to fit in.
    In TOK I read an article on the map having to do with perceptions and culture in our world. I learned that being able open minded to difference and diversity, you enhance your knowledge and understandings, which opens a way for you to contribute positively to the way knowledge is shared and gained. We've also began reading a book in IB Literature called the "Invisible man". From what we've read so far, I notice a man who aches for the attention of society, he is not accepted into a community because of his skin color. Society in this scenario lacks open mindedness and knowledge. Because they are unfamiliar with a certain kind, they see it as a means to treat them inappropriately.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Jenifer

    The title of the video I watched was “Dreams from Endangered Cultures” however the man speaking never said what cultures were endangered rather discussed different stories of different cultures in which most of them if not all he had experienced. The man never criticized the cultural differences but only told their story, aware of the differences, and fascinated with the different perspectives of these individuals. Being able to personally interact in a different culture allows you to personally experience the cultural diversity and allows you to understand what is they do and why they do it. Beliefs and ideas can be told about different cultures in a book but if you were to ask these people of different culture what their belief is would it be the same answer as the one in the book? Culture changes the perspective of individuals. Values of a certain object and morales of an individual are not the same because of this. Just like as the man from the video said humans from around the world all may listen music however they all have a different rhythm.

    The man within the video also discussed about language. There are a variety of languages because there of a variety of cultures, each waiting to tell a story in a different tongue. There was a part within the Ted talk where he spoke about a culture that had a custom to marry someone who spoke a different language. This means that it is possible to interact with someone and not necessarily know what is being said but still understand, all you have to do is listen. With this in mind I recalled back to “The Arrival”. In the book there was always someone in the ‘new world’ where the male character went that told a story about their past experience/ life similar to the man from the Ted talk video discussing the different cultures and their way of thinking. Looking at previous pictures within the story you can assume that the man from the book had trouble with the language spoken in the new place. The man from the book is similar to the man in the video because although they did not speak the language of the different people they were able to sit and listen to the different stories and understand. It came to a point where language was no longer a barrier. Language is also a way in which you speak with another person. In history class we learn about the past because history needs to continuously be taught so those in the present are aware of the past in order to learn from it , if not then the past will be forgotten and it may be repeated similar to culture needing to be continuously taught or it will be forgotten and typically will never come back. We use language in order to teach these things to other people to keep the knowledge from never dying out.

    Watching this video made me recall a recent discussion within literature class. We were discussing a quote from “Invisible Man” that stated “Those two spots are among the darkest of our whole civilization-pardon me, our whole culture…”. We then discussed why it is the author did that. I chimed in on the discussion explaining that i felt as though the different meaning in the words is what makes it impactful. Civilization is something more structural and scientific to categorize a group of individuals, more physical. Whereas culture is an internal concept that is historically embedded within our roots of ancestry, influencing our perspective on things in regards to beliefs, morale, and so on. By changing the word it makes this quote much more deeper because of the authors statement darkness within this culture and if culture makes us who we are then there is some darkness within ourselves.

    How is the knowledge being taught impacted by cultural diversity?

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  24. Jeneva

    While watching the Ted-talk by Jimmy Nelson, I immediately thought of the Novel that I'm reading in World Literature class titled, “The Invisible Man”. Mr. Nelson captures different groups of people from all around the world in their natural environment. He stated that finding where he belongs or where he himself fits in as a person is why he takes pride in exploring the vanishing tribes."People that belong" essentially inspired him to discover where he belongs. Nelson also emphasized the concept of beauty and how he also spent majority of his life trying to find out if he was "perceived as being beautiful". The main character of "The Invisible Man" sees himself as being invisible because he doesn't feel as if the people around him accept him for who he is. Beauty doesn't have to be based on aesthetic, often times cultural beliefs and rituals impact one's idea of what beauty is. A connection from chapter one was made when Nelson went onto explaining that he had an idea that he would go around the world and photograph females from 25-35 years of age because they were the only definition of beauty that he knew. In order to fully capture the true culture of the people, Nelson had to make connections with them, by learning more about them and their rituals. This later allowed him to see that beauty doesn't always have to be physical,it has more to do with your interactions with other people and even accepting yourself as the person you are. Nelson explained that respect for oneself and others, is an aspect of being beautiful that he discovered. The problem with the main character of the Novel is that he's having a hard time finding respect from the people around him which aides in him not seeing himself as being beautiful or in his case being invisible.
    Nelson’s photographs of the different people reminded me of the first couple pages of the graphic novel “The Arrival”, in which the people were all basically photographed the same but they looked different. They each had aspects of them that differentiated themselves from one another. Even though the reader doesn't understand why the author or illustrator placed a variety of people from ethnic backgrounds on the same page, the audience does acknowledge a reason for the variety. To me that's similar to Jimmy Nelson’s photography, the audience wouldn't fully understand the meaning or purpose of the photographs without him explaining them, but we do know that they were taken purposefully. This connects with the whole idea of beauty and how there are many aspects that can determine one's beauty. I think that the way something is interpreted relies heavily on this new definition of beauty that I have. Negative comments or judgments based on looking at something is an example of interpretation that can be based on cultural and social aspects that shapes how a person views different things. During my perspective reading, I gained more insight on Hispanic authors and how people view them. People tend to label them as being a Hispanic writer which almost immediately makes them think that the author wrote about their “story” growing up as a Hispanic person which isn't always true. If I had only looked at the photographs that Jimmy Nelson took without any background information, I would immediately think that they're all from at least one hundred years ago, and that people like the ones photographed do not exist today. Not only is my knowledge on other cultures limited, but also my tendency to factor out any type of cultural heritage or rituals that are not American descent is enlarged based on selfishness. This leads me to begin to question my own “beauty”. If Nelson did not have a Ted talk about his photographic process and inspiration, would I as a person that has claimed to be culturally and religiously tolerant, be able to accept and acknowledge the art that is within rituals around the world that still exist today.

    How does self perception influence one’s judgement of others?

    ReplyDelete
  25. Jeneva
    While watching the Ted-talk by Jimmy Nelson, I immediately thought of the Novel that I'm reading in World Literature class titled, “The Invisible Man”. Mr. Nelson captures different groups of people from all around the world in their natural environment. He stated that finding where he belongs or where he himself fits in as a person is why he takes pride in exploring the vanishing tribes."People that belong" essentially inspired him to discover where he belongs. Nelson also emphasized the concept of beauty and how he also spent majority of his life trying to find out if he was "perceived as being beautiful". The main character of "The Invisible Man" sees himself as being invisible because he doesn't feel as if the people around him accept him for who he is. Beauty doesn't have to be based on aesthetic, often times cultural beliefs and rituals impact one's idea of what beauty is. A connection from chapter one was made when Nelson went onto explaining that he had an idea that he would go around the world and photograph females from 25-35 years of age because they were the only definition of beauty that he knew. In order to fully capture the true culture of the people, Nelson had to make connections with them, by learning more about them and their rituals. This later allowed him to see that beauty doesn't always have to be physical,it has more to do with your interactions with other people and even accepting yourself as the person you are. Nelson explained that respect for oneself and others, is an aspect of being beautiful that he discovered. The problem with the main character of the Novel is that he's having a hard time finding respect from the people around him which aides in him not seeing himself as being beautiful or in his case being invisible.
    Nelson’s photographs of the different people reminded me of the first couple pages of the graphic novel “The Arrival”, in which the people were all basically photographed the same but they looked different. They each had aspects of them that differentiated themselves from one another. Even though the reader doesn't understand why the author or illustrator placed a variety of people from ethnic backgrounds on the same page, the audience does acknowledge a reason for the variety. To me that's similar to Jimmy Nelson’s photography, the audience wouldn't fully understand the meaning or purpose of the photographs without him explaining them, but we do know that they were taken purposefully. This connects with the whole idea of beauty and how there are many aspects that can determine one's beauty. I think that the way something is interpreted relies heavily on this new definition of beauty that I have. Negative comments or judgments based on looking at something is an example of interpretation that can be based on cultural and social aspects that shapes how a person views different things. During my perspective reading, I gained more insight on Hispanic authors and how people view them. People tend to label them as being a Hispanic writer which almost immediately makes them think that the author wrote about their “story” growing up as a Hispanic person which isn't always true. If I had only looked at the photographs that Jimmy Nelson took without any background information, I would immediately think that they're all from at least one hundred years ago, and that people like the ones photographed do not exist today. Not only is my knowledge on other cultures limited, but also my tendency to factor out any type of cultural heritage or rituals that are not American descent is enlarged based on selfishness. This leads me to begin to question my own “beauty”. If Nelson did not have a Ted talk about his photographic process and inspiration, would I as a person that has claimed to be culturally and religiously tolerant, be able to accept and acknowledge the art that is within rituals around the world that still exist today.

    How does self perception influence one’s judgement of others?

    ReplyDelete
  26. Jeneva

    While watching the Ted-talk by Jimmy Nelson, I immediately thought of the Novel that I'm reading in World Literature class titled, “The Invisible Man”. Mr. Nelson captures different groups of people from all around the world in their natural environment. He stated that finding where he belongs or where he himself fits in as a person is why he takes pride in exploring the vanishing tribes."People that belong" essentially inspired him to discover where he belongs. Nelson also emphasized the concept of beauty and how he also spent majority of his life trying to find out if he was "perceived as being beautiful". The main character of "The Invisible Man" sees himself as being invisible because he doesn't feel as if the people around him accept him for who he is. Beauty doesn't have to be based on aesthetic, often times cultural beliefs and rituals impact one's idea of what beauty is. A connection from chapter one was made when Nelson went onto explaining that he had an idea that he would go around the world and photograph females from 25-35 years of age because they were the only definition of beauty that he knew. In order to fully capture the true culture of the people, Nelson had to make connections with them, by learning more about them and their rituals. This later allowed him to see that beauty doesn't always have to be physical,it has more to do with your interactions with other people and even accepting yourself as the person you are. Nelson explained that respect for oneself and others, is an aspect of being beautiful that he discovered. The problem with the main character of the Novel is that he's having a hard time finding respect from the people around him which aides in him not seeing himself as being beautiful or in his case being invisible.
    Nelson’s photographs of the different people reminded me of the first couple pages of the graphic novel “The Arrival”, in which the people were all basically photographed the same but they looked different. They each had aspects of them that differentiated themselves from one another. Even though the reader doesn't understand why the author or illustrator placed a variety of people from ethnic backgrounds on the same page, the audience does acknowledge a reason for the variety. To me that's similar to Jimmy Nelson’s photography, the audience wouldn't fully understand the meaning or purpose of the photographs without him explaining them, but we do know that they were taken purposefully. This connects with the whole idea of beauty and how there are many aspects that can determine one's beauty. I think that the way something is interpreted relies heavily on this new definition of beauty that I have. Negative comments or judgments based on looking at something is an example of interpretation that can be based on cultural and social aspects that shapes how a person views different things. During my perspective reading, I gained more insight on Hispanic authors and how people view them. People tend to label them as being a Hispanic writer which almost immediately makes them think that the author wrote about their “story” growing up as a Hispanic person which isn't always true. If I had only looked at the photographs that Jimmy Nelson took without any background information, I would immediately think that they're all from at least one hundred years ago, and that people like the ones photographed do not exist today. Not only is my knowledge on other cultures limited, but also my tendency to factor out any type of cultural heritage or rituals that are not American descent is enlarged based on selfishness. This leads me to begin to question my own “beauty”. If Nelson did not have a Ted talk about his photographic process and inspiration, would I as a person that has claimed to be culturally and religiously tolerant, be able to accept and acknowledge the art that is within rituals around the world that still exist today.

    How does self perception influence one’s judgement of others?

    ReplyDelete
  27. Mabel Gbenro

    I found this video quite interesting and insightful. What I found most interesting was how the photographer had to gain the respect of the people and get to know them before they would allow him to take a picture of them. I found this peculiar because people would usually not want to take their time getting to know someone or someone willingly opening themselves to a stranger. Many of the people he captured on camera have very rich and bold culture that the seem very proud to practice. Many of the people in the different communities were able to connect with each other and have respect for each other on an intimate level and truly cared for one another. It was somewhat of an eye opener to see how the people in all the different communities did not necessarily need the un-necessary technology that we take advantage of everyday. I think that the many places around the world the photographer visited, and the many people of different culture he was exposed to seemed like a wonderful experience. He was able to be introduced to different perspectives and ways of thinking. One the caught my attention and seemed to have an affect on him was the concept of destroy, reflect, rebuild then respect, that he learned from a tribe.
    Connecting this video to the graphic novel The Arrival, I noticed that in the video the photographer/speaker showed a screen of many different faces of people from all around the world. They all had very distinctive features with something that would kind of differentiate them from each other. This was also present in the first few pages of the novel. They did not have the same faces as each other, but both share a variety of faces with different cultures, backgrounds and experiences. Something they both share relatively the countenance of the people in the photos. They all have somewhat of a solemn facial expression.
    In my literature class, I a reading a book called the Invisible Man. In this novel the invisible man did not really know where he belonged and feels as though he does not fight. In the video, the photographer also tries to figure out where he belongs but did so by finding people who belong themselves, as well as finding rituals that matter to him, to see how they actually fit.

    Possible knowledge Question:
    As describe by the photographer describes how he chooses the community of people he wants to capture by their beauty and aesthetic, what generally determines the beauty of something and the platform it is based on?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Claire
    This TED talk focuses on the ideal concept that as people we all have certain universal things that we do, which can consist of how we celebrate, mourn, dance, and even cop with illnesses. However, with different cultures gives arise to different possibilities, in regards to these things. These possibilities result from the human imagination, which can be the source of creative ideas. Our imagination also influences our thoughts/dreams, myths, ideas, inspirations, and intuitions. In English, we our constantly reading novels and plays. In everything that we read, as a part of our understanding, we try and justify the author’s intent and how his or her background may influence the meaning of the novel or play. We recently started reading Invisible Man and in one section of the novel it said, “Though invisible, I am in the great American tradition of tinkers…Perhaps I like Louis Armstrong because he’s made poetry out of being invisible… it must be because he’s unaware that he is invisible.” When I first read that text, it left me puzzled as to what the true meaning was. However, due to my own imagination regarding what an invisible man truly is. I came up with the idea that being invisible in this sense could mean the disadvantages of being Black and that the author could be trying to address two or more types of people. The African American who knows they are invisible so they do not attempt to take any opportunity that may make them “greater”, or the person who knows they are invisible but doesn’t accept that and tries to change that by taking any opportunity to prove themselves. It is also primarily expressed that our culture affects everything around us, from how we see the world, to how we see ourselves. Diversity in culture is stimulated by language, however, there is a constant increase in language loss. “Every language is an old-growth forest of the mind, a watershed, a thought, an ecosystem of spiritual possibilities.” In my reading of So Much Depends, the author briefly discussed the life of William Carlos Williams. In that she talked about how his mother spoke Spanish in the home and often embarrassed him with going into trances and speaking to her Caribbean dead. She used her language to expand her spiritually connection, similarly to other cultures, such as some of the people in Haiti who also make connections with dead/ the spirits around them. Not only can learning a language assist in making spiritual connections but it can better your understanding of the areas of knowledge. In each of the areas of knowledge they have their own language, such as art. In art, a part of our understanding, discussing and critiquing of art includes understanding the language, which consists of words like color, line, shape, form, texture, and space. During my first critique in art we were taught the proper language for critiquing, such as “I wonder if...” “Could you explain...?” “What is the significance of…?” The more I began to use the proper language of art the more I could understand and articulate my ideas based of pieces that I saw. I realized this when I noticed how I used to describe the work of artist like Jean Michel Basquiat as simply several different lines and colors, but with more understanding I was able to identify, describe, and explain the neo-expressionist aspect throughout his art. Although, some aspects of American culture can show that we often hear people practicing a new language in order to understand, that isn’t always the case for other cultures. In Barasana, which is in the Northwest Amazon, they believe that you must marry someone who speaks a different language. However, due to their culture they do not practice a language. “They simply listen and then begin to speak.” I know that even learning Russian isn’t something that I would ever be able to just listen and speak instantly. For me, the more I practice the different aspects of Russian, such as my numbers and stems then I begin to really understand the language and advance onto being able to speak it.

    ReplyDelete
  29. (Continued)
    Ultimately, the TED talk was an effective way of involving and informing the listener of the diminishing of different cultures, while including aspects of each culture. They included each culture, without labeling them as immoral based off of the standards of western civilization and culture. Which may view cultures of others, such as the Kogi people as wrong. However, the Kogi peoples’ way of “initiating” or “training” priest, by keeping them inside away from all light for 18 years can be compared to birth of a child and the nine months they spend in the womb. Essentially, the cultures of others that we may view as weird and uncommon are simply a result of the person/ groups of peoples’ way of surviving and living in the environment they are in.
    Possible Knowledge Questions:
    How can culture be diversified by language?
    Can language explain a culture?

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  30. Lindsay Wimbish
    Video 2
    Wade Davis speaks about how traveling and seeing another culture, where the people still remember their old ways. He discusses how certain cultures still have their past in everything they do. He says that although everyone has different cultures, we still have similar adaptive imperatives; childbirth, initiation rites, and death. Each culture has different forms of art, music and dance. In Visual Arts we have been researching how where people are from and what time periods they lived in affects their art. Their art is different based upon these two elements. In more developed countries, such as countries in Europe. In the 1700s there were a lot of paintings, which were dominated by the Rococo and Neoclassical styles of art. But in Native American tribes, basket weaving was the most popular form of art. They used materials like rocks, feathers, cloth, clay, and fabric. Each culture has different music, with a different rhythm and a different way of dancing. This shows diversity in how people think, act, and feel. In the past couple decades, half of the languages have become forgotten or dead languages. Each language represents a culture. He addresses the thought that ‘it would be better if everyone spoke the same language.’ In chapter 1, we discussed how everyone sees the world map differently based off of their location. We cannot just pick a map and say that it is correct just because we think it is. The maps show different perspectives. In this same way, we can't pick a language and say its superior and everyone then will have to speak it. Each aspect of a culture shows their perspective on the world and themselves. The Waorani tribe, was contacted in 1957, and they killed the missionaries because they did not understand the photos they sent down and thought they were calling cards from the devil. In Chapter 1, becoming internationally minded is discussed. It says to keep in mind that others have developed differently than you. Although, they were trying to be friendly, the missionaries were being friendly as they knew from their culture, but the Waorani people have not seen that type of technology and it seems that the missionaries forgot that this tribe has not been contacted and wouldn't know what they are looking at when given those photos. Wade Davis describes the snuff that the Yanomami people blow up their noses as harmful and he exaggerates the pain. He criticizes it saying it creates a dissolution of reality. In TOK we were shown pictures of a ceremony involving putting hooks into your back, immediately, the class judged them because we thought it was painful and crazy. So many groups of people have been changed by outsiders. When outsiders contact a tribe, it's not usually just to meet new people. A lot of times there is a gain for the outsiders. The people of that culture then are forced to adapt. For example, after the trees were cut down, they were no longer able to run through the trees freely anymore, because they just were not there. Living in a place where there are not many big forest to be cut, and where I am not personally affected, I don't generally think about the people who do live in these forest. I forgot that not all groups of people are living the same way that we are.
    Knowledge Question: How do we know whether it is right to contact the world's uncontacted groups of people?

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  31. Mariatu
    Nelson has a deep passion for cultures that allows him to take pictures of people of different backgrounds. Not only does he want to understand himself but the world around him. When watching this TED talk, the picture in the beginning of people of different backgrounds reminded me of looking at the “The Arrival”. In the Arrival, they also had a picture of people that seem to be from different backgrounds. Their faces were very dull and unpleasant just as the ones in this TED talk. Looking at the pictures of people from different cultures reminded me of class time in Biology. We looked at cultures and learned their different aspects of life (and significance) due to their genetics. Here, Nelson talks about their significances in their culture. For example, when he talked about the people of Galam’s tribal hats that they wear he brought out what it was so important to them. Nelson took a whole new step into learning about other people’s cultures. He actually went out and traveled the world to view these interesting people. To understand another one’s culture you need to be able to be open to learn about it. You need to see explore the culture yourself just as he did. How does learning about someone’s culture affect your mindset on the world?

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  32. Brea
    When looking at images of tribal cultures, Borges was able to view the lives of people within very remote locations. The first Culture in Tibet consisted of many people who celebrated and revered the Dali lama for his practices and views. Due to tibet having a ban on his photos, Borges snuck small photos of the Dali lama in order to understand their perception of him. When given the photo, many people held it close to their heads. This reaction was one of gratitude and happiness due to the fact that the very person that they value highly is not only banned from their land, but from every aspect of their culture. This reminded me of how many people seem to worship Mao Zedong’s image in China due to his leadership. However, Zedong is celebrated openly and established as a ruler of that state, and unlike the Dali lama, is not banned within his country. Zedong also had ordered that his image be placed there and also was seen as an icon due to propaganda set by the media. Borges mentions that of the 6000 languages in the world, there are languages with only one elder knowing it. In “The red convertible” the narrator resembles the struggle that many cultures have to keep their traditions and languages alive. The narrator is the one who represents the younger generations being set within new ideas and seeing their older generations as something not necessary to learn. This is seen when the narrator was able to do many new things (such as owning a store or working with nuns) and earn money while doing it. Borges continued discussing a south American tribe in the Ecudorian Amazon, he mentions that they have had to keep moving their area due to an oil spill. He also mentions theHuaorani tribe. They are another tribe that have attempted to cope with the oil spill and the workers that have been coming due to it. I think that the tribes are being imposed upon because of not only being forced to leave, but a tribe shaman even states that he is tired of them. This reminds me of chapter 1 in the TOK book because it shows that different cultures have a different viewpoint on what their idea of living space is, as well as the concept of how they see the world map. The workers don't see themselves as a problem, but as a source to help clean the region up. However, the workers dont realize that from the tribal viewpoint, they are getting in the way of how the tribe wishes to live.

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  33. Brea Borges states that “Getting kids used to different realities, I think, is so important.” He further goes on to explain how he has worked with schools around the globe in some of the most remote locations, including the Artic Village in Alaska. This reminds me of History class and how our teacher views gentrification. There was a class lecture on how refugees and other people coming in are greatly taken care if in some countries and easily adapt. I feel as if this concept of teaching someone your ways and expecting them to become tolerant of your own is what is causing many if these world languages to be lost upon the elders. With every child given a laptop and internet in these remote locations, the more they can focus on the other parts of the world and learn about this “mental flexibility” that Borges wants to instill in them. Each time a child is influenced by a new culture, they are pulled away from their own due to how astounding that new culture seems to them. This is similar to the TOK class dicussuon in which our instructor mentions that many kids who come to America, usually have never been on the internet,but then suddenly become heavily immersed in it. When thinking of it in this context, many people fail to realize that language is an important aspect of any culture and that children are easily influenced within the ways of the world, especially if it's new and interesting to them. When looking at these tribal schools set up, one must wonder if the introduction of western ideas and culture are the cause of the many languages dying out due to no one but the last remaining elders using it.
    My Question is this: With the introduction of technology, is there a loss of culture within a group?

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  34. Aniyah
    Although Voodoo is a sub-Saharan African religion it is viewed not as a religion, but as the practice of dark magic when it really the belief in an visible, life, and invisible, death, world. Voodoo focuses upon the relationship between the living and the dead. It is said that the spirits can be summoned from beneath the Great Water in response to the beat of a dance that will, for a moment, displace the soul of a living and for a moment the dancer becomes a God. Christians may see Voodooists as practicing some sort of devil magic while they dance and look “possessed” while the Voodooists themselves would look at the Christians preaching and talking about God when they become God.

    One of the main ideas from chapter 1 of TOK is Personal Knowledge, the knowledge one obtains from experience. An example of this is when Davis mentioned the Cofan tribe, this tribe has 17 different versions of a ayahuasca plant. In order to distinguish the plants from each other the Cofan takes each of 17 versions and will be able to tell them apart because each one “sings to you in a different key.” Now the Cofans are able to differentiate between the 17 varieties because they now know each one sings.The Arrival by Shaun Tian is an example of Culture Shock because the main protagonist of the story leaves his home town and heads to a foreign country in hopes of a better life for his family. He ends up feeling disoriented and even isolated when he is subjected to the foreign country’s different attitude compared to the town he left, although he gradually adapts.

    When Davis mentioned the story about how during the 1950s the Canadian government had tried to force the old Inuit man from his home into a settlement but the old man was used to the cold temperatures and was able to use it to his advantage in order to escape, but in the year 1999 the Canadian Government had given the Inuit people back independent land that was larger than California and Texas put together. this situation reminded me of a subject in History. We learned about the Korematsu Vs United States case, during WW2 there was Presidential Executive Order that gave the military the authority to exclude citizens of Japanese ancestry from areas that were essential to national defense. A Japanese man, Korematsu refused to leave California and violated the Civilian Exclusion Order. He took his case to the Supreme Court, arguing that the order was unconstitutional, the Supreme Court said the executive order was constitutional and that ensuring national security outweighed his human rights. In 1988 President Reagan signed a legislation that would give reparations to more than 100,000 people of Japanese descent who were incarcerated in internment camps. Each story shows that it is not impossible for a nation-state to look for restitution with their people they have wronged.

    Question: Can people with diverse cultural environments, in a way, exist in different worlds?




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  35. Tamara

    The topic of the Ted talk was cross cultural communication. The speaker of the Ted talk Pellegrino Riccardi discusses his personal and professional experience with different cultures. Riccardi has traveled the world for the past 27 years and interacts with different cultures, nationalities, and people types. Riccardi aims to help people communicate better with other nationalities especially in a global business world. In connection with IB Business and Management class cross cultural communication is important for businesses. High-context cultures (Latin America, Central European, African, Mediterranean, Slav, Arab, Asian, American-Indian) leave much of the message unspecified. Low-context cultures (most Germanic and English-speaking countries) on the other hand expect messages to be explicit and specific.

    International communication is influenced by cultural differences so it is vital for businesses to develop an understanding of this in order to successfully communicate. His approach is to tell people to take a look at themselves first before looking at other cultures. A big concept of cross cultural communication that is addressed is perception which is having the ability to understand what people see. A challenge that he has with working with other nationalities is that some people tend to see what they want to see and not what you see. I aim to be open minded to alternative perspectives and being able to assess them critically. In IB Spanish it is important that I learn about cultures from Spanish speaking countries such as Chile, Peru, and Colombia in order to develop an appreciation of different cultures other than my own.

    Riccardi defines culture as a system of behavior that helps us act in an accepted or familiar way. A person’s environment such as family and school can affect their cultural perspectives. People can have different ideas of what of what is accepted and familiar since they perceive things differently. People from different cultures can be misperceived because sometimes their actions or language can be perceived negatively by other nationalities. In chapter one of “The Arrival” it is a story of a man who leaves his family and emigrated to a foreign place. The man struggles to communicate with people since he speaks a different language. The behavior from the citizens could have been perceived negatively by the man and vice versa. The language, environment, and objects are new to him so he has to adapt to living in a new place.

    In the perspective reading “The Cossacks of Connecticut” by Daniel Rose, he had conflicts of self identity. Rose outward appearance showed that he was an assimilated Jew. Rose was ashamed and had negative associations with being a Jew. Rose felt isolated from people because him being a Jew was not accepted or familiar in Connecticut during the 1950s. He felt pressured to be socially accepted as the “Connecticut kid and a New York Jew” rather than being his true self. In order to communicate with people effectively people have to see beyond cultural characteristics that are observable on the surface such as dress, language, and food and become aware of deeper cultural differences. I learned that a global mindset can be created by expanding my awareness of other cultures and being open to diversity among different cultures.

    KQ: How can people from different cultures establish effective mutual communication despite cultural differences?

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Thanks for posting!!

Swift