Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Homework: Blog Post due by 7 am Friday 11/13/15

Strengths & Weaknesses of Data Sets

  • 1.  Decide with your group members which 6 of 8 articles you will read
  • 2.  Read, synthesize, and post about the articles you chose (2 per group member)
  • 3.  Slide to access the article links:  LINK


Items to consider in your post:
  • Strengths & Weaknesses of the types of data presented
  • How does it apply to what you researched in class on Tuesday 11/10?
  • How does it apply to the essential question?  Your definition of poverty?
  • Your chapter reading from the TOK Text?

31 comments:

  1. Joycelyn 3A
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ihyTM1GPZ4s59T6SucAvYLuR-6ST2htkBej1hY3zySM/edit?usp=docslist_api

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  2. Stephanie 3A

    I have chosen to read articles 4 and 7; and in my opinion I personally felt that these two specific articles strongly reflected the topic of discussion. After intently reviewing over both articles a major theme I detected was actually the contrasts and comparisons between qualitative and quantitative data. I found it very interesting to learn how both can be very disadvantageous and advantageous towards the definition of poverty, as I was able to specifically learn of the strengths and weaknesses that lie in both types of data. In my group, when I was given the opportunity to provide my own definition of poverty I mentioned that poverty doesn’t necessarily have to deal with the lack of materialistic matter but we at times forget to notice that our wealth can simply be the richness of our hearts. A very significant point that was made in my first article actually dealt with how we typically view poverty and how it is never usually the case. The article specifically mentioned how we originally use to view poverty as solely an income related issue; however, the article goes in and stresses the fact that we are now faced with the existence of multidimensional poverty ( which engages many aspects of the human way of living). This then brought about the main focus of the article; which related to the creation of the MPI, also known as the Multidimensional Poverty Index. And I believe that this is where the difference between qualitative and quantitative data is very much visible; especially when being presented with the problems of the MPI and how it can be replaced by the CSPI ( the Correlation Sensitive Poverty Index). In this case I feel that the MPI represented the limits of qualitative data and CSPI demonstrated the benefits of quantitative data. I for one was very shock to learn how limiting the MPI actually can be; in reference to how it doesn’t equally represent all impoverished nations and limits them from receiving the help they really need. And this is where the CSPI comes in as the quantitative data; demonstrating all relevant pieces of data so that all information is represented. However, I cannot completely dog down qualitative data; according to article 7 qualitative data is actually very compelling because of its production of human experience, which cannot be provided by quantitative data. And I can strongly make this connection to the research I had conducted on Tuesday. I was specifically looking into the impoverished history of Haiti and from the aspect I was looking at; much of their data is in fact qualitative because of how it reflected their current state based on circumstances such as the 2010 earthquake. But ultimately even after reading the history chapter in the TOK text I have personally learned that all types of data are greatly needed in order to assess a situation. Whether it be based on our own personal observations ( which could be qualitative) or calculated numerical data ( quantitative). Let’s face it, we need them both to shape value judgments. And these value judgments are what create our perceptions about impoverished nations. At times data can be deceptive, but its presence provides us with the steering towards sculpting our thoughts on important issues.

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    1. How will you make sure that Haiti gets a fair shake in your group's representation during the TED talk?

      Delete
  3. Mubeen 3A

    I found both of the articles I chose very interesting. I used to think that determining poverty meant that you had to determine the amount of income people make in a period of time and setting a standard for how much you make to be in the poverty line. I also used to think that poverty only meant that you could only afford the needs in life. However, I read an article and particularly found the information regarding the Multidimensional poverty index very fascinating. The multidimensional poverty index. It has multiple strengths and weaknesses. With it, we cannot determine if a person is also malnourished and illiterate as well, and this is very unfortunate. However, a strength would be that it determines HOW a person is poor. Another strength is that with the MPI, we can know that poverty affects individuals and third parties as well. For example, if 30% of children are malnourished and 30% are out of school, we can now know if the families of those children are affected by these deprivations or not. My favorite component about the MPI is that is cleans data of anomalies and focuses primarily on poor people, thus, making data more accurate and reliable. Another limitation with the MPI is that in its methodology, it does not add up achievement levels, and sets weights as value judgements. This means they primarily determine the value of certain deprivations by weighing them and there are people who see this as a strength, but there are also people who see this as a limitation because prices are not being used. There might be people who disagree with my appreciation for this information I’ve gathered, and that is fine. For example, people might agree that setting weight as value judgements is brilliant idea because it makes the data more satisfying and accurate.
    The research I did the other day and article two are connected in a particular way. All of the information I’ve gathered from this article made me develop two questions: Is there a way that the MPI method can be perfected and free of error and contradiction? And to what extent is this method reliable in determining poverty? The research I did showed that the country of vanuatu is undeveloped, prone to natural disasters, and dependent on tourism and agriculture. The fact that the country is underdeveloped, prone to natural disasters, and is dependent on agriculture and tourism means that people could easily be in the poverty category. People could be in the poverty category if they are not making money in tourism or agriculture and that is the unfortunate thing about this undeveloped country. Article two discusses how poverty thresholds should be calculated by using current data about how much families actually spend on food, clothing, and shelter. If one wants to calculate the poverty threshold in this country, then one should consider these factors.

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    Replies
    1. What message will you bring about how to calculate poverty as it pertains to your country of research?

      Delete
  4. Temitope 3A
    Strengths:
    GNI per capita quantitative data and can be used to determine a country’s monetary measure of quality of life such as life expectancy and primary education rates. Quantitative data can easily be gathered in abundance. Qualitative data describes the qualities or characteristics of something. behavioural coding is assigning numerical values to qualitative data, so that it can be analyzed statistically. Quantitative data is expressed in numbers and can be analyzed using statistical tests. Statistical analysis allows us to recognize trends and differences between groups. Quantitative data can be very descriptive.
    Weaknesses:
    Does not reflect inequalities in income distribution. Does not take into account the difference of domestic price levels. GNI may be underestimated in countries that indulge in subsistence activities. Difficult to gather large amounts of qualitative data. Qualitative research data has less statistical power than quantitative research when it comes to discovering trends. Behavioural coding is time consuming and expensive. Difficulties interpreting quantitative data.Most of the research that I did on Tuesday was based on quantitative data. Quantitative data is good at describing trends and differences but does not show interpretations, this means that someone interpreted the data in the documents that I read. This is a limitation because I do not know if they are biased toward any side which may influence their interpretation. Initially I defined poverty as lacking enough assets to sustain one’s life. Based on the way I defined poverty you can not collect data on poverty through qualitative means, which is easier to interpret. You can only collect data through quantitative means which has its limitations such as not providing an interpretation. On the other hand if I had defined poverty based on intangibles, such as love, friends and happiness, it would be very difficult to collect a large amount of data on this because I would have to collect qualitative data. The type of data you have at your disposal influences the value judgment made. For instance if someone told you that they have one loaf of bread to eat per week. This is quantitative data and you would have to make your own interpretation. You would probably say that the person is living in poverty. Compared to if someone said that they have one ten pound loaf of bread to eat per week, you would say that, the person is eating very well, although the person's diet lacks variety. This is because qualitative data is more easily interpreted. Math is usually based on numbers and so it would be deemed quantitative data. So that mean that math contains all of the weaknesses that quantitative data contains, such as the lack of interpretation.

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  5. Taylor, John & Esmeralda Articles Link
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1K6IEvWb5iXYK5AfRJRe1WzPSW5qbjJe5EMEG9pgjPFg/edit?usp=sharing

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    Replies
    1. Taylor, couldn't the bias you discuss with qualitative data be applicable to quantitative data as well with respect to interpretation?

      Is the GNI in Yemen "good" relatively speaking in comparison to other countries in similarly situated?

      Delete
  6. Nadia

    Article #1 Assessing Grameen Foundation’s Progress Out of Poverty Index
    http://nextbillion.net/assessing-grameen-foundations-progress-out-of-poverty-index/

    The People out of Poverty Index (PPI) is easy-to-use and cost-effective. This is helpful and important when non-profits what to calculate the PPI of places, without spending lots of time and money. However, the PPI “tool requires measurement of only ten items.” There are always going to be limitations, but even more so when you’re measuring someone’s poverty level based off ten questions, or rather ten answers. The test also adds weighted values, which to an unaware reader, can be misleading. The PPI wants to standardize how poverty is measured. “This standardization would enable interested parties to compare results over time and across groups, regions, organizations etc.” This would be helpful when trying to determine how groups are doing over time, and whether current policies/actions are effective. The PPI engages in multiple models of assessment in order to best asses poverty. PPI is graded out of 100, aims to standardize the measurements, and doesn’t involve anything regarding mental health. My definition of poverty, and everyone else’s should, includes mental wellbeing. If people don’t feel good about themselves, then what’s supposed to motivate them to do better or try harder. The Grameen Foundation’s PPI generates a lot of value judgements- based off of their 0 out of 100 score, which is based off ten questions. Overall, this doesn’t seem to be a very good way to judge people’s poverty level. It’s an improvement over the past; people are actually being asked about their poorness and groups are making an attempt to quantify it all, but it’s still not all that good. There has to be a better way to “calculate” poverty than this and there has to be a way that, not only serves as a collection of data but that, also quantifies it; make people realize and feel what is happening to others.

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    1. Why isn't the PPI a good measure of poverty?

      Delete
  7. Esther
    In article 2 titled, “ It’s time for a better poverty measure”, it talks about how the measures of determining if one is impoverished should change. This article states that poverty has changed throughout the years since 1960s but the poverty line has not changed. This depicts that many people who are in the world are impoverished, even though it is not stated on data. With the data that they used, they did not include tax, food stamp, etc which is significantly important to determine if one fall under the poverty line. In TOK class on Tuesday one thing that I researched was the world Bank data, which stated questions that were asked to determine if one is impoverished. These questions are significant because it correlates to the article because many people who answer the questions, for example, What material is used for your roof? Other basic questions were asked, the National Academy of Sciences stated that new measures for poverty should occur, and be determined by the amount of money indented to meet the basic set of needs; food, clothing, shelter, etc. From this a communal pool was needed to determine who falls under the poverty line. In the Mathematics section the communal pool is where mathematicians peer review each other's work to determine what will be useful solution based upon the problem. The calculations that the NAS stated is that in 2007, the official poverty threshold for a two-parent, two-child family was $21,027. In not for this data then in New York 18 percent would fall under poverty, but in due to this data it is 23 percent. If the data had been 18 percent then one would assume that New York is a functional city, in which obtains many resources and many people are successful, which is slightly not the case in this situation. A weakness of NAS is that it uses basic necessities, but their is more than the basic sets when it comes to the developmental needs of children. In article 6 titled, “Strengths and Weaknesses of Quantitative and Qualitative Research”, it discusses the use of quantitative and qualitative studies together and separate. In the Quantitative study it deals with obtaining statistical/ numeric information from surveys, or benchmarks. Surveys are used to obtain information of a person in order to place them into a category, to determine where they fall in the world, poverty is the main topic, in which data is collected, to determine if you are impoverished based upon your finances. With quantitative data dealing with numbers, discussions cannot be furthered because it lacks human behaviors toward the numbers they choose. Also, with quantitative studies value judgments are developed to understand why the data is the way it is. Qualitative studies are beneficial in this case because the people state why they feel a specific way. Qualitative studies deals with Human behavior, emotions, and characteristics. Behavioral coding can be used in order to identify behaviors, this technique is time consuming and expensive. This depicts the process, in which those who are impoverished go through.

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    Replies
    1. How can we use human behaviors in collecting data about poverty?

      Delete
  8. Nadia 3A

    Article #8 Why use GNI per capita to classify economies into income groupings?
    https://datahelpdesk.worldbank.org/knowledgebase/articles/378831-why-use-gni-per-capita-to-classify-economies-into

    GNI per capita does more than calculate monetary poverty, it ‘calculates,’ as best you can with such things, the quality of life. “Life expectancy at birth, mortality rates of children, and enrollment rates in school,” are a few of the aspects of lives that the GNI examines. This is imperative to mental health and addressing total poverty; not having things that are essential to physical and mental wellbeing. The World Bank recognizes some of GNI’s shortcomings, “GNI may be underestimated in lower-income economies that have more informal, subsistence activities. Nor does GNI reflect inequalities in income distribution.” This is a weakness of GNI, but because the World Bank is so forthcoming with this flaw, people know it and can make value judgements with this in mind. The World Bank also explains how the Atlas Method, how the GNI converts local money into US dollars, “is based on official exchange rates, which do not account for differences in domestic price levels.” As mention in the History as an AOK chapter, there is a plethora of information available today, that hasn’t always been around. With all this information available, the World Bank would be purposely misleading people had they not mentioned the few weaknesses of GNI. Due to their honesty and self evaluations, I feel confident in using the World Bank data to form value judgements about Niger, the country I’m researching.

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  9. Awura
    Article 2, “Advantages and Disadvantages of Qualitative Data,” provided practical information could be incorporated to the research that I am conducting with my group. An issue that comprehensive data or any kind of survey-styled sources could run into is the honesty of the individuals being questioned. With qualitative data also brings narrative data, which is based only the individual himself with his story using visuals, texts, or spoken word. The strengths of this article include its self-criticism of its form of research but its weaknesses lie in its one-sided perspective. What makes the claims being made in this argument not useful to the research I am conducting about Timor-Leste is the efficiency of qualitative data obtained through survey and questionnaires because there is absolutely no way that I could personally interview the Timorese because of location. As the article suggests, this data could not be used on a general basis or referred to on a large scale, which could leave a hole in my own study. This form of data could lead to be distinct and clear responses. There are a few disadvantages or weaknesses linked to qualitative data where the researcher has the leeway to bias, which could ultimately alter the results. Humans, being the imperfect beings that they are tend to not have memory reliable way of knowing either therefore I could never be certain when relying on word of mouth. In my IB Math Studies course, I knew the dangers of conducting a survey and having that much say-so in the questions being asked. I was aware that people could very easily lie and they tell the truth. I decided to take my IA on a different tangent and formulated an experiment that actual athletes would participate in. To make matters as accurate as possible, I tested my theory in order to determine the strengths and weaknesses of my IA first hand. The research I conducted last class focused more on the general aspect of things where I looked into their population, climate, politics, geographical history, and location. Taking all of these factors into consideration, qualitative research could potentially lead to inefficient discoveries due to its specificity. When making value judgments, I could argue that qualitative data may not be the most useful tool in the conduction of my research.

    The second article that I dealt with, “It’s Time For A Better Poverty Measure,” took into consideration the NAS approach. Just as the previous article, the strengths and weaknesses were listed for the ready to get a clear view of what the implications were. This method will be far more beneficial to my group and I’s research on Timor-Leste where the geographical variations in thresholds are compared to the actual costs is included. Some issues that I may face might root from the criticism that suggests that the NAS approach aims substantially low. Others believe that things are not improving or being developed. The Measuring American Poverty Act’s components were discussed along with things like it historical measure, resources, and thresholds just to name a few. This topic had a lot in common with the definition that a procured prior to my research on Timor-Leste, the Southeastern Asian island.

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    Replies
    1. How is qualitative data useful? Should we discard it? Does quantitative data give us a "true picture"?

      Delete
  10. Awura (cont.)

    These articles reminded me of the Ethics: as an Area of Knowledge chapter where there is an abundance of shared knowledge, thoughts are evaluated along with choice and action. They were their own critics just as ethics and the human sciences were. In reference to the essential question, data behaves as a restriction, categorizer, and filter. Based on my definition of poverty; poverty is the state of lacking a necessity or mean of survival. It is being impoverished, poor, or without, for the most part I was not ill informed but definitely did not consider the small countries like Timor-Leste who did not pick their fate. Tying everything that I discovered together, the methods discussed had a fair share of weaknesses and strengths that could lend itself to be more useful to the claims that I making about the country I am researching. The second method will definitely support my research more easily. Referring back to the essential question, data will continue to play the role of a categorizer, as it will continue to label and filter the data being received.

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  11. Chamira 3A

    According to the World Bank Data, the United States Gross National Income (GNI) is $55,200. According to the new CARE and Energy Savings Assistance Program 2013-2014, a family of five (standard family household number) would have the annual income of $55,140 in order to be considered low-income, $60 below the GNI. I found this very interesting because this data has many limitations and may not be fully accurate. Article 1 was about GNI and the strengths and weaknesses to it. Although it estimates the average income for a citizen's country and gives a person an idea of the quality of a country, it does not reflect equal income distribution. It also underestimates in low-income economics. Some people may have side businesses that they do not include that in their annual income. When the government sends people mail in order to find the GNI, some may not be accounted for. There are many components that can cause a person to question this data. Article 8 was about Progress out of Poverty Index (PPI) which is a poverty measurement tool for organizations and businesses in order to help those in need of financial assistance. There are strengths and weaknesses to PPI also. PPI was described by the Grameen Foundation as "simple and accurate." Although PPI give assistance to those in need, many people take advantage of the welfare and become dependent. I feel as though as Americans, we think we are obligated to many resources that many foreign countries do not have. The country my group is researching, Vanuatu's GNI is $3,090. I admire the fact that even though they aren't as developed as the United States, they are very resourceful, independent, and hard working, versus someone who depends on the government for financial support. As I was researching Vanuatu and its culture, I found out how many people are farmers, which is a tedious task. They do not have advantages thrown at them, so they make it work with what they do have. This point goes back to my first definition of "being impoverished" : a state of mind. According to the World Bank Data, the Vanuatuans are financially poor. However, they are rich in their thinking and how they operate as a country. This also connects to my Area of Knowledge, the Human Sciences (psychology). How a person views something could be way different than others perception. As an American, I first viewed Vanuatu and compared the country to my living arrangements in America. At first, I didn't acknowledge their government, land, culture, etc. before making judgments. In conclusion, data can give you an idea, but not the full understanding of something.

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  12. Tiyra :)

    Article 6 and 7 Qualitative (and Quantitative) Data


    Qualitative
    Strengths: Provides description of things necessary for life, interviewing is “free form” allowing the interviewer to change their approach quickly

    Weaknesses: Since the idea is based from observation, it’s hard to say that it is always accurate (sense perception chp.), unclear what data is meaningful, trends must be continually verified, cannot be transformed into statistical analysis unless time and money is available, quality of research depends on the ability of the researcher, presence of researcher is unavoidable which can influence data, difficult to represent visually

    In class, I came across a website that described the conditions in Vanuatu. Firstly, I came across some tourist sites that made everything look wonderful, but then elsewhere, I read about how Vanuatu is only urban in two places, Port Vila and another island on the other end of the country. I also read about some things the people of Vanuatu do, but I’m not sure if the current information is helpful. I’m not even sure about the history of how the population has moved around the island. I imagine the population to be dense in the cities, but there must be people outside of them that must be taken into account.

    In terms of the essential question, not all data is relevant and useful in any given time. We decide relevance and base judgements off of that. Qualitative data is a prime example. I thought that being able to save money while working and living meant a lot, but there’s no way for me to tell how the money is allocated or what a person's priorities and values are.

    Qualitative data is similar to history in the way that there’s always a grey zone in which the researcher is responsible for filling in to the best of their ability. Having such faith in the abilities of someone else is really something interesting in itself.

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    1. Tiyra
      I don't know why, but my second part didn't post :(

      Quantitative
      Strengths: Descriptive, allows the compilation of a group’s data, statistical power can increase by
      increasing sample size.
      Weaknesses: Lacks information needed to interpret the data, needs accuracy verified by a large
      population , data can lose meaning as the sample size increases

      This information tells me that the percentage change statistics from past years may not be as
      specific as first thought to be. As Nadia pointed out (and it was mentioned on the source website),
      The population size increased causing the percentage to decrease while in actuality, the amount
      of people below the poverty line stayed the same.

      For the essential question, not all data is necessarily aiding in making reliable value judgements as
      the data itself is faulty.
      I thought that the amount of money saved while working mattered, but in actuality, it could not
      mean as much as I think it does. Currency changes value all the time, statistics are probable
      based on a hypothetical situation in which the ratios and percentages are ideal.

      Just like how data has more value if the sample size is larger, the same is true for historical facts.
      If more than one person remember the same thing in the same way, then the memory they all
      remember is taken as truth. Contrary to statistics however, history only seems more plausible and
      undeniable as it is verified by more people. Also, similarly with history, there are some parts that
      need to be filled in. Just like with statistics, historians want to know why things are the way they
      are. There are some parts where one has to reason on their own to interpret the effects.

      Some things to think about and overall takeaways
      - Both articles mention the persuasive effect of data as statistical power and both articles had
      different views. Article 7 about qualitative and quantitative data stated that quantitative data has
      more statistical power because it can be easily subjected to statistical analysis. Article 6 about
      qualitative data said that qualitative data has more statistical power because it is based on human
      experience. This made me wonder what exactly statistical power is and whether the authors of
      both articles were using it in the same way.
      - In Article 7, it is stated that quantitative data is only as relevant as its effect size.
      - For qualitative data, Article 6 says that having a researcher present is unavoidable and could
      affect the data. I beg to differ. What about doing a real time chat (w/o camera)? Then the
      researcher could still quickly repose their question and wouldn't be a factor in the data.
      -The real question here is the value of qualitative and quantitative data. Does one matter more
      than the other? I stated earlier some information about statistical power, but is that an effective
      means to judge these two types of data? It obviously caters towards one type of data and is
      indefinitely more difficulty to determine with another.
      - Also can someone tell me the meaning of this:
      Data is usually gathered from few individuals or cases therefore findings and outcomes cannot be
      spread to larger populations. However, findings can be transferred to another setting.

      Thanks for your help! :)

      Delete
    2. What other areas of knowledge are qualitative? Does that make them less reliable in knowledge production?

      Delete
  13. Tiyra continued lol

    Quantitative
    Strengths: Descriptive, allows the compilation of a group’s data, statistical power can increase by increasing sample size.
    Weaknesses: Lacks information needed to interpret the data, needs accuracy verified by a large population , data can lose meaning as the sample size increases

    This information tells me that the percentage change statistics from past years may not be as specific as first thought to be. As Nadia pointed out (and it was mentioned on the source website), The population size increased causing the percentage to decrease while in actuality, the amount of people below the poverty line stayed the same.

    For the essential question, not all data is necessarily aiding in making reliable value judgements as the data itself is faulty.
    I thought that the amount of money saved while working mattered, but in actuality, it could not mean as much as I think it does. Currency changes value all the time, statistics are probable based on a hypothetical situation in which the ratios and percentages are ideal.

    Just like how data has more value if the sample size is larger, the same is true for historical facts. If more than one person remember the same thing in the same way, then the memory they all remember is taken as truth. Contrary to statistics however, history only seems more plausible and undeniable as it is verified by more people. Also, similarly with history, there are some parts that need to be filled in. Just like with statistics, historians want to know why things are the way they are. There are some parts where one has to reason on their own to interpret the effects.

    Some things to think about and overall takeaways
    - Both articles mention the persuasive effect of data as statistical power and both articles had different views. Article 7 about qualitative and quantitative data stated that quantitative data has more statistical power because it can be easily subjected to statistical analysis. Article 6 about qualitative data said that qualitative data has more statistical power because it is based on human experience. This made me wonder what exactly statistical power is and whether the authors of both articles were using it in the same way.
    - In Article 7, it is stated that quantitative data is only as relevant as its effect size.
    - For qualitative data, Article 6 says that having a researcher present is unavoidable and could affect the data. I beg to differ. What about doing a real time chat (w/o camera)? Then the researcher could still quickly repose their question and wouldn't be a factor in the data.
    -The real question here is the value of qualitative and quantitative data. Does one matter more than the other? I stated earlier some information about statistical power, but is that an effective means to judge these two types of data? It obviously caters towards one type of data and is indefinitely more difficulty to determine with another.
    - Also can someone tell me the meaning of this:
    Data is usually gathered from few individuals or cases therefore findings and outcomes cannot be spread to larger populations. However, findings can be transferred to another setting.

    Thanks for your help! :)
    I wouldn't let me post the entire thing in one piece

    ReplyDelete
  14. Jesse 3A
    Article 5: Indeed as the article author tells us the MPI is not perfect and in my opinion will not be either. The MPI creator does include many valid arguments to back up why his creation might be genius. Exploring the distribution of poverty is indeed a section that needs to be taken into account because after research on poverty there is indeed different aspects of what aspect of poverty you can be in. I believe a major strength of this article is that it argues that people should never look as poverty as just household consumption when it can be an array of different types. But there are some weaknesses to this, while reading this article again in my head why is there so many different types of poverty. Why can we not just keep it under household consumption, The article never really explained that. Why should we care. Also a weakness of the article was that, people who aren't or don't believe they actually have poverty might take this MPI as an offense because in my opinion it looks as if the whole point of it is trying to just find a way to call someone poor. Specifically when it said if you are a billionaire but have never really gotten a good education then you're poor academically. From what I learned with research Tuesday with the data received it can be assumed with backup arguments that Haiti has poverty in many different categories. Not enough data to assume that the whole country has poverty. This article assists me to make a better in depth definition of poverty even though I still question, I do believe that there is more to poverty than just money. From the human sciences perspective It assists me to also further my judgement that someone rich can also be poor.

    Article 8: Even though short with more room for explanation, I believe I got the gist of what the article is attempting to explain to its reader. I believe the author of the article is actually against GMI's because it spends no time on any strengths of the GMI's. Not a very different perspective article, because I can clearly see what might be many weaknesses of the GMI's but there aren't many positives. The article gives a correct definition of what GMI's do in the last sentence of the first paragraph. Much like article 5, it goes into depth of defining poverty, the GMI's focus on income and money and a few other factors like the MPI. This article shows another way of defining poverty but in my opinion I believe it's more focused of how much the country is making rather that any other factor that was listed. From the human sciences perspective, like the MPI shows either many factors like education can lead to poverty.

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    1. So should the MPI be used to measure poverty?

      Delete
  15. Victoria
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/18Rn0JccokSRoL-6jNo-M7GDyPqOEhcHB-L3ycVjYWyM/edit?usp=sharing

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    1. How can we make quantitative data more compelling?

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  16. John 3A

    Article 1:

    The PPI is supposed to be “simple and accurate tool that measures poverty levels of groups and individuals.” This sort of system is suppose to be more accurate because it would change to different countries needs and find data that are most closely correlated with their poverty group and that number is narrowed down to 10. However even it comes with it strength and weaknesses. Some strength of the PPI is that it becomes a standard system which interested parties can use to track down the progress of poverty in that country. This allows for quicker action to results that are not in place. However some weaknesses include the fact that there is uncertainty on whether the whole group of BoP are being portrayed realistically in this standardized process. However the PPI tackles this challenges by being a measuring tool that changes over time. So that if new indicators come up to be stronger than the others, then they can be altered and included. They also usually focus on things that most likely will not change over time. This method of gathering information makes me more certain that the information I gathered for Yemen is accurate. Especially since these programs are adaptive programs that change with the course of the country's history. Even though there is fear right now that the country quantitative data might not be the best way to gather information, it is still the best way have have now until we can find something better. It seems data plays an important role in valued judgements, because it is physically impossible to go visit every single house in Yemen to receive that information, so implying that it is what is through mathematical process is the next best thing. According to my TOK chapter on Mathematics, math is every changing anyways and as we move into the future, we will begin to find better ways to represent the things we have in front of us.

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    Replies
    1. How would you suggest poverty being represented? Combo of quantitative and qualitative? or one over the other?

      Delete
  17. John 3A

    Article 7:

    Qualitative research is the exact opposite of the type of research I mentioned above, but even it has its strength and weaknesses. Qualitative research refers to investigation methods and observation. The weakness in this process of gathering data makes it lack large sample numbers. The sample numbers are very small and have to be spread out to accumulate for larger populations. Second the researchers could arise some bias towards this form of research because they come in already expecting to gain data that they can fit into the bigger picture. The researchers themselves could just be bias without realization. Finally information can be easily misleading or exaggerated to fit the person's needs. It does however have many strength; it is a human based research that is quickly adaptive in the field. There are no standardized method of doing this, and the end results depends completely of the interviewee and the the one being interviewed.This takes less of the mathematical approach and more of the historical and human science approach to the problem. Although talk about money is relevant in their discussions, it is not the primary focus. This method of gathering information would be hard in a country like Yemen, because I feel like people with unique lifestyles would be interviewing less advantages people and it would cause confusions. It is however an effective way to gather information for a smaller population of people, and I believe overtime as we gather more information, it will become more beneficial to us.

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  18. Camilla 3A -

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1yM8l8uyIUJCdfXLW89jw8j1rUlB4Uk2-vc567ChM1VQ/edit?usp=sharing

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Thanks for posting!!

Swift