Wednesday, April 9, 2014

This Week: Project Implicit and Lateral Thinking



Take Two tests:
~You must take the Race IAT~  The second is your choice…challenge yourself
~Reflect on your results prior to the completion of the follow-up questions.

Project Implicit LINK

Follow-Up Questions

Do you think that these tests are valid?  When you first saw your results, did you question or accept the test's validity?

Give examples of the cultural messages that may support attitudes linking a dominant group in your nation or culture with "good" or "superior" attributes and a subordinate group with "bad" or "inferior" ones.  Are these attitudes generalizations that can be called stereotypes?  How can generalizations be distinguished from stereotypes?

If some of our consciously held beliefs, attitudes and values are undermined by what Gladwell calls rapid cognition (others call this intuitive thinking or even gut feelings), what do you suggest we can do to combat jumping to (false) conclusions?

 Compose your response in a word document and then cut and paste it into the comment's section of this post.

Remember:
1.  Choose Anonymous in the drop down menu
2.  First Name only
3.  Your response
4.  Reply to another student as well

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Lateral Thinking

3 paragraphs due to www.turnitin.com

 


29 comments:

  1. Tunji

    I was not surprised with my results for the Race IAT and the Age IAT. These results shows that the community I live in affects the way I think of the world. I expected my results to be what they were supposed to be. My Race IAT said that I prefered black people over white people and my Age IAT said I prefered young people over old people. I am mostly surrounded by black people and I am surrounded by young people on a daily basis. I believe that your community has a huge affect on your perception of the world.
    I believe that the Race IAT test was valid. My result for it was, “your suggest a moderate automatic preference for African American compared to European American.” I accepted my results. I accepted them because I live in a mostly African American community and go to a mostly African American school. An example of a cultural message is that white people have more opportunities than black people because most of the nation’s population is white. This is a stereotype because all people have the same amount of opportunities, it is just about how much work you put in and how much you want whatever you are aiming for. Another cultural message is that white people are more educated by black people. This is a stereotype because it is a person’s choice whether or not they want to learn, that should not be linked to their race. Generalizations can be distinguished by stereotypes if they are aiming towards a racial group. Just because a small population in a racial group does something, it does not mean everyone in that group does something. What people should do to prevent from jumping to false conclusions is to go to a reliable source of information after hearing something from someone and to find out for themselves if it is true or not instead of relying on other people only.
    I believe that the Age IAT test was valid. My result for it was, “your data suggest a strong automatic preference for young compared to old.” I accepted my results. I accepted them because I am around people my age most of the time throughout the week. I found no surprise in my results. An example of a cultural message is that young people are more radical than old people. I do not believe this is a stereotype because old people would want things to stay the same because they are already used to it, but young people want change because they want new and fresh ideas in the world in which they still have a lot of knowledge to gain. Another cultural example is that old people are more knowledgeable than young people. I do not find this a stereotype because old people have been around longer than young people, which means they have more scraps and fragments of knowledge and information then young people. I think generalizations can be distinguished from stereotypes depending on the age of the person who says the “generalization.” What people should do to prevent from jumping to false conclusions is by questioning the source of information they received their information from and conclude if that source is reliable before deciding if the information is reliable.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Jemuel
    These IAT tests were definitely interesting to me. As soon as I saw them pair up a bad word with white people and switch it up, I knew what they were doing. I definitely think that the test is valid although there are some factors that can affect the results. I found that my muscle memory was contradicting with what I was seeing for a little bit. The switching took place in a small amount of time so my muscle memory was telling me something while my eye was telling me otherwise. At first I questioned the validity of the test by I still accepted it anyway. I understand that I have preconceived notions of what is bad and what is good and I know that that affected the results of the test. The Race IAT showed me that I had a strong preference of Europeans over African Americans which I was definitely unsure about. I definitely knew that there would be a little bit of preference of Europeans over African Americans but I did not think that it would be strong. This is because of the way I was brought up by society, and everyone just has a preconceived notion of Europeans being “professional people” while African Americans are more related with bad things. I think that the results show the result of what society has done to the testee because our preconceived notion comes from our society and the way we grew up.
    When you see job applications and colleges advertisements, you will most likely see a white man in a suit putting his thumbs up. It is more likely that you will see a white man doing something good than a black person. Our society has been doing a better job at this by promoting African Americans and having an African American president surely helps. I think that having the majority of United States’ population as white people can also affect this factor. If you have more white people in a country, they are obviously going to be advertised more than the minorities of that country. I do believe that these attitudes can be considered stereotypes because we are judging people by the way they look. Generalizations applied more on objects rather than people thus, making this a stereotype. If you say that a person who is carrying a basketball can play basketball, then you are making a generalization. If you say that an Asian is smart, then you are stating a stereotype.
    To combat our gut feelings or rapid cognition, we must become more aware of things that we are not aware of. We must become a more balanced person who has knowledge on just about everything so that we won’t have to make guesses or stereotypes or generalizations. We would know exactly what we are talking about without the influence of others or our society. Of course, a little help from society will also help and I think that so far, we are moving in the right direction. United States is often called “the melting pot” because of the diversity that this country offers and this diversity will open the eyes of many people. Being introduced to other races while you are young will remove biases that you could have developed if you grown up in another country where there is only one race. Also, equality plays a big role in these stereotypes because more often than not, one race is held above another in a certain subject. Being well-informed will allow us to not come to false conclusions and make better judgments about the things around us.

    Raskoff, Sally. "Everyday Sociology Blog." Everyday Sociology Blog. W. W. Norton, 14 May 2012. Web. 09 Apr. 2014.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nnedi

      I agree with Jemuel about how our preconceived notions play a major role in determining our prejudices. The things we learn from other people as well as the beliefs were brought up in can hinder our perception. For example, the media has taught us that African Americans engage in violence more than any other race. This might have served as a factor when doing the IAT test. It is very imperative that we sit down and analyze our prejudices so that we will not have to learn the hard way. Like Jemuel stated, becoming more aware of the information thrown around us can help us stop our rapid cognition. By doing this, we are able to sort through the pros and cons of prejudices that can ultimately impair our judgement.

      Delete
  3. Ashley

    I think that these tests are valid to an extent, there may be some bugs that they need to fix. Sometimes I think that when I try to associate certain things into categories it is because I am confused, of forgot which side is which. This may cause invalid results because of forgetfulness, and confusion. I thought that this test was also invalid because they already had a concrete definition of what goes into which category. Some one could have had a different interpretation of what a certain word means, or for example what they considered overweight, or thin. I did not like how the already gave us a segregated distinction between two categories. But I can also see how this test can be valid because they based these tests off of impulse, off of what you know and what you perceive something to be. What society has implanted in our heads, what society has labeled as overweight, thin, or old, and young. When I first saw the result, I questioned them at first, mainly because I did not want to come off as shallow, or prejudice. But then I thought about myself as a person, my prejudices, my preferences, and what society has embedded into me then I began to accept them and agree with the results. I began to understand that the test was based off of impulse and what you quickly associate different categories together, the more mistakes you make the more the association of the categories are indifferent to you. Like I previously stated that the test already gave us concrete distinction between categories. For example with the weight test. They mostly associated "Fat with Bad" and "Thin with Good" This is just supporting the stereotypes that society has made for body weight. They always make T.V. shows of people trying to lose weight, or diet commercials for diet supplements, or diet programs. In movies and shows people usually ridicule overweight people, people are always trying to loose weight, people are making themselves throw up. You never see a T.V. show or a movie of someone actually trying to gain weight. Like people who suffered from anorexia, or bulimia. Maybe occasionally people are trying to gain muscle weight, but never fat weight. Since people are always trying to lose weight, to get rid of it, it is interpreted as bad. There are always shows of thin models, beautiful thin girls, Victoria Secret models, the shape the males are attracted to, so females are always trying to reach that goal of male attraction. I personally do not think that generalizations can be distinguished from stereotypes. We generalize things into categories, because we as human like to organize and put everyone in a specific group we want to be able to have a quick distinction to someone when needed. When we generalized things we make an average of everything and the segregate them. To fight what Gladwell suggest is "rapid cognition" we have to take our time in making distinctions, and think specifically to that person. There are many components, and perceptions that take part in categorizing. For example with the weight issue. We have to consider someones age, height, and what the preferable body mass for someone that age, and height should be. We have to consider someone's lifestyle and if they are proper weight for that specific environment. Like someone may be perceived as fat in society, but they might not be if they are a sumo wrestler. To stop gut feelings we have to look at specifics to each individual.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Catherine O.
      I agree with your post. With the test, a lot of times I was just confused and frustrated and made many mistakes as a result. In my head, I was just following the directions that were given. Also, it is true that we don't see a lot of people on T.V. trying to gain weight. I know for me, I find it surprising when I hear someone is trying to gain weight, and I always wonder to myself why would a person ever want to gain weight; unless its for medical reasons.
      I question why you think generalizations can't be distinguished from stereotypes. Not all generalizations are stereotypes. There are some harmless generalizations that people make simply from observation; not in the sense of jumping to false conclusions. I always considered harmless generalizations to be fair, and stereotypes to be unfair; even if they're positive.

      Delete
  4. Jazmine 3A
    I think the test scores of my first test were valid because I notice that I do personally have a moderate preference for African American compared to European American. It is not strong, but it's not slight either. My preference is right in the middle category, which I think is good because it means I'm not too bias. When I first saw the results of my first test, I accepted rather than questioned the test's validity because I felt the results from the test were accurate based on how I am. I think the test scores of my second test were invalid because I was moving so fast that I kept making mistakes. When I first saw my results for this test I questioned the test's validity because it directs you to go as fast as you can but making too many mistakes will alter the results of the test to be inaccurate. Some cultural examples are how James Brown came out with that song and started the saying "I'm black and I'm proud" which supports attitudes linking Black people or African American people in the United States with a good attribute about themselves. Another example is how because of slavery, the idea of white people are superior to black people has become engraved I'm people's perception and created false stereotypes and racism among the two racial groups. Generalizations can be distinguished from stereotypes by if they were made based on facts rather than opinions, and if they were made based on appropriate observations and knowledge rather than bias and hate. To combat jumping to false conclusions we can take the time to find evidence and support to back up our intuitive thinking which will make into a true conclusion and fact.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tunji

      Commenting on Jazmine’s Post: Jazmine and I have similarities in our post. We both consider that the Race IAT test valid. We both felt like the test was accurate and we did not question our results. I believe that we did not question our results because our results are based off the community we live in. We both had a moderate preference for African Americans because the community we live in is mostly African American. The people we are surrounded by on a daily basis has an affect on our perception. I found that Jazmine finding out that her results for her second test was invalid because she was getting too many wrong interesting. I had no problem taking both of my test. I was going at what I consider a moderate speed, about 1-2 seconds per option. Whenever I felt like I was getting bored, I would get two wrong in a row then get back to focusing and getting the rest right. I did find the IATs slightly uninteresting, but it tells us something about ourselves that we should be aware of. I think the IATs are tests to help you learn more about yourself, and you should accept your results whether you like it or not.

      Delete
  5. Jocelyn M 3A
    I believe that these exams are not at all valid when trying to distinguish what we may prefer more. The reasoning being is because I felt as if they really pushed a person to be very selective and it was very narrow. Although it may have had the options of moderately and strongly, I feel as if it was still targeted to one answer only. When I first saw my results, I completely questioned it. I strongly did not accept the test and its results because I personally think it shows no reflection of who I am as a person and what race group I prefer. I think the website was more aimed to putting African Americans under the category of bad because if we didn’t choose this during the first trail in pairing the two then it would mark it as wrong; therefore, although I morally knew that African Americans did not represent a bad message the test certainly implied it from my perspective. Then the second time around it had us categorize the pictures or words under the opposing sides. I think what this test does is just use a repeating method which causes your brain to select certain answers because it was at first correct. A message that I really got from this test was that African Americans are really looked at as being inferior. I personally did not jump to conclusions in this case; I think I was more focused on trying to respond to each picture and phrase because the test was timed. Therefore, I think other people may have had preconceived notions about the two groups causing them to categorize them the way they did. I would have to agree with the gut feeling, in automatically assuming that then categorizes were positioned the same place they were at first which caused me to select different answers the second time. From the results, I also see that some people either had a strong or moderate preference for white over black. I think that there could have been many factors that led to the results. However, one’s beliefs may have caused a person to jump to the conclusion that European Americans are joyful while African Americans may be in agony.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Jocelyn N.
    1) The test has proven to be mostly valid when it came to my answers, but I feel that the test can’t be valid to the majority of the population. The only people that can actually do the test without any physical biases are people who are ambidextrous. When I saw my results, I accepted them as valid because they did show the personal preferences that I believe I have.
    2) One of the cultural messages in El Salvador is that Americans (specifically those who are Caucasian) cant be trusted. This can be seen in a game that is played around a variety of festivals that is known as “kill the white people” if translated into English. Those of African American descent do not necessarily get the same treatment because there are many Hispanics that are dark and can be taken as African Americans. These actions then create a variety of negative stereotypes towards both races, but Caucasians can be seen to have a bad stereotype whereas African Americans have a neutral stereotype.
    3) I do not believe that one can ever truly find a way to stop themselves from jumping to conclusions based on the beliefs, attitudes, and values that one has. In order to combat conclusions, the best way is to get more information first. Learn to be curious rather than fearful of the unknown. To be fearful of the unknown can make one hesitant

    ReplyDelete
  7. Jennifer, 3A

    I do not think the tests are valid due to the way the test was set up. Instead of analyzing the race and the category, I got accustomed to following a certain pattern. Once that pattern was broken, it got very difficult to determine which belong to each category. When I saw my results I questioned them because I know for a fact I am not racist, and this connects to why I do not think this is an accurate test. When I took the gender test, I do believe it was based on my beliefs and the way I grew up. My results stated that I believe women belonged at home and men belonged at an office job. This was influenced by the media, and by my parents due to the way they were taught and it is what they are passing down to me. For example, my grandma always told me that it was a woman’s job to take care of the household and that man were more responsible of bringing money to the house. In order to prevent ourselves from jumping into false conclusions, we need to make sure whether we have fully analyzed something in order to make accurate generalizations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jazmine 3A
      I mostly agree with Jennifer when she says the tests were not accurate based on the technique they used to test people. I too became accustomed to a certain pattern which only confused and messed me up while choosing the answers. The speeding and timing of tests also made it hard for me to correctly select the answers I intentionally wanted. But, the difference between Jennifer and I are that I believe the results from one of tests were correct and accurate based on how I am.

      Delete
  8. Jennifer, 3A
    I do not think the tests are valid due to the way the test was set up. Instead of analyzing the race and the category, I got accustomed to following a certain pattern. Once that pattern was broken, it got very difficult to determine which belong to each category. When I saw my results I questioned them because I know for a fact I am not racist, and this connects to why I do not think this is an accurate test. When I took the gender test, I do believe it was based on my beliefs and the way I grew up. My results stated that I believe women belonged at home and men belonged at an office job. This was influenced by the media, and by my parents due to the way they were taught and it is what they are passing down to me. For example, my grandma always told me that it was a woman’s job to take care of the household and that man were more responsible of bringing money to the house. In order to prevent ourselves from jumping into false conclusions, we need to make sure whether we have fully analyzed something in order to make accurate generalizations.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Adriana 3A

    When I took the Race IAT, my result was that I have a slight automatic preference for white people compared to black people. When I first saw my results I accepted its validity. I pretty much agree with it because I feel that it’s been implanted in my mind that white people are more preferable or more desirable than black people. The people you see in the media are mostly white. In books, the characters are mostly white. So there wasn’t really much of a choice in having an automatic preference to white people because it’s what society has decided for me. For example, if there are black people in the media there is more of an emphasis on light-skinned people as opposed to dark or brown-skinned people. The lighter the skin the closer you are to being white. Even in the black community people prefer light-skinned people over dark or brown-skinned people. And some even think that they are better just because their skin isn’t dark. This generalization could be a stereotype because not all black people prefer light-skinned people or think that they’re better than other people.

    The other test I took was the Sexuality IAT. The results showed that I have a slight automatic preference for gay people compared to straight people. I think that this test was somewhat valid. I don’t really think that I have more of a preference for straight or gay people because either way it could be a cool person. It doesn’t really matter to me what their sexuality is. I accepted the test’s validity because sometimes gay people can be way less judgmental than straight people because they’re always being judged. So they can seem like nicer people. I also questioned its validity because I personally don’t see a difference between gay and straight people. They’re just regular people.
    Gay people are usually associated with being “bad” because a lot of people are religious and being homosexual goes against their religion and in Christianity it is considered an “abomination.” Because of this a lot of people think that being gay is disgusting or just wrong. Straight people are considered “good” because marriage is “Adam and Eve not Adam and Steve” or because “that’s how God wanted it to be.”

    To help with jumping to conclusions, we should just really think about the situation before we come to a decision. Maybe our gut feeling or intuitive thinking isn’t always going to be right so we might need to rely on other things like reasoning.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Telani 3A
    Though it seems that the test does not actually work, in a way, they are valid. Our minds were making quick decisions on a series of words and pictures. At start, it was used to stimulate the mind then when using words and picture, our minds would lean to one it would go to automatically. When I read my results for Race, I questioned whether the test actually worked or not. But when I did the sexuality test, it did prove that I have not personal preference for straight or gay people. Since I’m always around both, it wouldn’t affect me as much. Our culture is growing to accept gay people, and in my family, we already do. Since I am African American, I would have more preference because of my race. But also attending to almost half the population of the school being black also plays a part. Since I’m always around black people and little to no white people, I would of course have a slight preference to black people. In our country, there is such thing as “white privilege”. The white people in our country are able to get away with certain laws because they didn’t know better because of their white privilege. Other culture messages such as white woman syndrome, when I white girl/woman goes missing, everyone would be helping to look. Our society is basically run by the white men, and they get decide on whose good or bad. The test proves that people have preconceived notions about different races and people who are different and decide that it’s wrong. Our religions and culture helps us decide what generalisations are stereotypes. Generalisations are hitting a specific group of people, with statements that are normally true in real world settings. Stereotypes are over dramatized situations that are may be true for some people but is mostly false in some aspects. It is placed in some perfect world that could be true for some people. Like cheerleaders and football players rule the school. But going to a normal high school, sports may be in the forefront but it is not the only thing some schools care about. The way our unconscious minds are able to jump to false conclusions is getting closer to someone who is different from you. You get to meet new people and be able to understand where they come from. In our world, we look at the enemy as someone who is bigger, larger than life, when actually they are the same as everyone else. May look different or act different but altogether might be the same. Our society has some difficulties in having the ability to interact with people different from us and not understanding. We attack those who are different and never given them a chance.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Catherine O. 3A

    I think the tests are valid to an extent. The overall result that I received at the end were valid and I accepted it because they did reflect my initial opinions or stereotypes on the groups. However, because I felt rushed, I feel like my selections were not completely valid. I had to answer fast and I feel like that caused to me to make many errors.
    In the United States, Christianity is the dominant religion as more than 73% of Americans are Christians. Islam may be considered as a subordinate group as it makes up about 0.8% of the population. Since Christianity is the dominant religion, much of our culture and views are shaped around it. We tend to label Christians as the righteous ones or the people that could never do anything bad. With Islams, most people stereotype them as the inferior group because of the stereotypes about how most of them are affiliated with terrorists or terrorist acts. These stereotypes are made mostly because the terrorists that they hear about are Muslim or of Islam religion. They make generalizations that since most of the terrorists are Muslim then Islam must be a bad religion. Many people don't understand the religion and don't want to take time to understand and learn because they may already have the idea that the dominant religion, Christianity, is the only right one. Another example is with basketball players in the NBA. According to the 2013 NBA Racial and Gender Report Card, African Americans made up 76.3% of all NBA players and 81% of players were players of color. The generalization that most people come up with is that all African Americans play basketball or are good at basketball. These generalizations that all Muslims are terrorists and all African Americans play or are good about basketball can be called stereotypes because you're making assumptions about an entire group based on observation. Because most of the terrorist we hear about are Muslims, we assume that all Muslims are terrorist or that the Islam religion is bad. Since most of the NBA players are African American, we assume that all African Americans play basketball or knows how to play it. The difference between stereotypes and generalizations is that stereotypes are biased assumptions that we make about all members of a group while a generalization is more of a logical conclusion.
    In order to combat jumping to false conclusions, I feel that we need to increase our knowledge and understanding of the subject at matter before concluding. If more are aware of the true conclusions about minority or subordinate groups, then less people will feel the need to resort to jump to false conclusions because they will already know the truth. We also need to make sure that we have considered all other possibilities and made sure of our conclusion. It would also be useful to commit to using counter-examples or counter-arguments to test the validity of our conclusions or assumptions.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Uchechi
    3A

    The tests I conducted include the Race IAT test and the skin-tone IAT test. Having done so, I have come to the conclusion that these tests are somewhat valid. The first result showed I have a moderate automatic preference for African American compared to European American. Evidently, I was able to distinguish faces of European and African origin because I surround myself with people of African origin more than people of European origin. In other words, I am of African origin and my family is of African origin. The moderate side of the preference most likely came from the fact that I surround myself with friends of both European and African origin. The second result showed I have no automatic preference between light skin and dark skin. Evidently, I was able to recognize light and dark-skinned face. This is because I have an equal automatic preference for light-skin boys and dark-skin boys. Although, I agree with the preferences, I do not believe one can find out their preferences in life through the use of online tests such as these because there is way too much bias. In a sense, I think the two brief questionnaires about me helped in proposing more valid results compared to the actual IAT in which I sorted words and pictures into categories as quickly as possible. In other words, the actual IAT test would be pointless without the two questionnaires that questions oneself.


    Examples of the cultural messages that may support attitudes linking a dominant group in our nation or culture with "good" or "superior" attributes include all Whites are successful and Asians are good at math, all Republicans are Whites, and all Blacks are good at sports. Examples of the cultural messages that may support attitudes linking a subordinate group with "bad" or "inferior" ones include all Muslims are terrorists, all Hispanics are illegal immigrants, all Blacks are lazy, women are not as intelligent as men, and All Africans stink. These attitudes are generalization that can be called stereotypes because evidently these groups of people were grouped because of their similar characteristics and actions. Many of these stereotypes have been conveyed in television and have influenced the way people have viewed real people in society. I will expand on the stereotype that “all Whites are successful.” Compared to other races, White have been higher up in scale in terms of social class, Whites are more likely to attend college, Whites are a larger part of the population, all Whites tend to think about money and power, and Whites are more driven to reach the highest status and highest paying jobs. In reality, if you apply yourself, you can do anything, and be successful in it all. I will also expand on the stereotype “all Muslims are terrorist.” Compared to other religious groups, in the media, Muslims have been portrayed as terrorists, from the countless terrorist attacks to the wars. In reality, there are just Muslim extremist groups. Islam is a religion of peace just like any religion. Generalizations can be distinguished from stereotypes because while all generalizations are stereotypes, not all stereotypes are generalizations. In addition, stereotypes are more of an overall belief that a specific group of people or things with a particular quality are the same, whereas generalizations are more of an opinionated belief based on little to no information on groups of people or things. An example of a stereotype is people who wear glasses are smart. An example of a generalization is school is fun and easy.

    If some of our consciously held beliefs, attitudes and values are undermined by what Gladwell calls rapid cognition, or what others call this intuitive thinking, or even gut feelings, I suggest we destroy these preconceived notions before encountering someone or something, or before learning of any evidence about it, to combat jumping to false conclusions.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Uchechi
    3A
    Continuing…

    It is our prejudices, biases, and preconceived notions that are ruining our world view, and resulting in negative consequences in our lives. Perception is not reality. Sometime in the past, I had this perception that homeless people were crazy, social misfits, attention seekers, losers, psycho, criminals, and drunkies. In addition, I had this perception that homeless people would try to panhandle and beg for money for no good use, enjoyed annoying everyone passing by, and enjoyed living low lives. I learned two new lessons: (1) almost anyone can be homeless and (2) be nice and humble, don’t treat homeless people like dirt. In reality, homeless people are just people who are trying to make it through life, and many of them end up on the streets because of outside forces, poor decision making, and inability to control certain situations. Nobody wakes up and declares that they want to start living life on the streets. I feel like people who are experiencing homelessness are just part of the landscape, and everybody is ok with it. Just like I have, society needs to change its perceptions about homelessness.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Kelly, 3A
    I do not think these tests are valid. How someone perceives a race, gender or one's appearance cannot be determined by an online test. Although some results may be true, it is not 100% reliable. When I first saw my results for the Race IAT, I questioned the test's validity. My data suggested a slight automatic preference for European American compared to African American. I disagree with this because I do not have a slighter preference for European American. They are both pretty equal, but I chose slight preference for African American. It may be valid to the extent where the results show what we do not know about ourselves. We may never agree with this test because we do not believe it is true. We may be in denial of what this test may call the truth. For my second test, I chose weight. My data suggested little to no automatic preference between thin people and fat people. This is true, but it still does not change my opinion on these tests' validity. One's reaction time should not determine what we perceive in a person. We should leave that to personal experiences when meeting the person. Preference in someone does not always concern appearance. If there was an European American ("good/superior")and an African American ("bad/inferior") in a store and there was something stolen, the African American would most likely get accused first. Looking at the situation in a form of a stereotype would be accusing the African American simply because of his race assuming based on unfounded assumptions. Generalizations would be rationalizing the situation and preconceived notions. Another example would be Asian American and African American. If a teacher suspects cheating, they may think the African American cheated off of the Asian American. This would be a stereotype because they assumed the Asian American was smarter than the African American. The teacher does not actually know this unless they had evidence to prove it. If some of our consciously held beliefs, attitudes and values are undermined by what Gladwell calls rapid cognition, I would suggest to rethink the belief and analyze it. Another suggestion is to educate yourself with the belief. Familiarize the belief with information you did not know already. Finding facts may prevent combat jumping to conclusions.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Alyssa

    I thought that it was a weird test. I wasn’t really sure what the purpose of it was until they put in the good and the bad. What I found interesting was that in the first round with all for categories they place the good on the African American side and the bad on the European American side. It made me think about how I was just like the little kids in the baby doll test. The baby doll test was when young children of different races were placed in front of two doll, one black and one white. There were ask question like which doll is ugly/pretty, nice/rude, etc. the majority of the kids pointed out the black doll when asked negative questions. Reflecting back on that it made me think about why my mind sought to automatically think about where they placed the words good and bad
    I feel like I was slightly expecting to get the result I got, slight preference for European Americans, because I feel like it’s all around me. Most the shows I grew up on as a kid and the movies I watched featured white lead roles and very few African American lead so it almost seemed right to have a slight preference. I even see it in my writing. When I’m trying to write a story I see myself struggling to pick what race my character would be, black or white. However, I still felt like questioning the results because I always tried to show no particular preference and I still feel like I don’t. On the other hand I feel like I sometimes try to disassociate myself with my race, in that I would feel happy about the fact that I don’t really like cool aid or grapes, I hate watermelon, fried chicken is not my favorite food, I don’t really listen to rap music etc. All these things are associated with the black community and being associated with the black community means people don’t expect much of you, if you do something bad it like “oh well, that’s expected.” I proud of who I am and I feel kind of ashamed to admit that I try to disassociate myself but I don’t want people to automatically judge if I happen to in any way conform to a stereotype. And it’s not like I’m deliberately trying to separate myself, or like I’m trying to separate myself from every black person. I just don’t want the negative stereotype hanging over my head. I believe the doll test with the little children was a good example of how we see one race as superior in a way. They have a lot to do with our history but more so today the stereotypes. For example a lot a times you would see vine videos that depict a black person getting in trouble but a white person would be off the hook for the same thing. I sure people mean no harm but we still indulge ourselves in those stereotypes.
    To combat jumping to conclusions we need to explore both out conscious beliefs and rapid cognation. Its best to evaluate both because then we can analyze the similarities and differences.
    Ask for the second test I did, age, I think the validity of the test was strong. I feel as a young person I probably would have a slight automatic preference to younger people it’s easier to connect. Even though older people are seen as the dominant group because their supposed to be more knowledgeable, it can be easier to talk to a peer.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Alicia

    I found, at least the race test to be exceedingly difficult and mildly irritating. It gave me a headache with the whole European Americans=Bad and African Americans=Good and vise versa. I mainly would blame my results on my very poor hand eye coordination, and the fact that the frustration was starting to get to me. It is, however, very fascinating how my results were opposite of my answers. In the beginning of the test, I said that I was slightly more lenient towards European Americans over African Americans. But the test stated that I responded faster when referring the African American to the words that were predefined as "good", even though I also blame my speed on my frustration, since at that point I just wanted the test to end. I guess I just found it fascinating how even though I may have a certain opinion about something, due to the environment I was raised around, my personal preferences may not always be the case of how my brain recognizes people, specifically races.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Obichi

    1. I do not think these tests are valid because there were a lot of glitches. The screen would go blank and I would have to press one of the two keys to bring the pictures or words back. But, whenever I pressed the key, it would use it as my answer to the next question. The whole process was bizarre. I do not entirely agree with the results. Because of the culture that I have been exposed to, I feel slightly more comfortable around European-Americans. The second test I took was about weight and the results kept saying that there were too many errors to determine a result. But, the errors were out of my control because the program kept messing up. In addition, the "determining" factors seemed like a ridiculous and inaccurate way of determining preferences because people may just generally be slow or fast when operating technology.
    2. Some examples of such cultural messages are the idea that all African-Americans are delinquents, and that Caucasians are wealthy and ambitious. These attitudes can be considered stereotypes because they judge a group based on popular belief. Generalizations have more supporting evidence than stereotypes; stereotypes tend to be misconceptions. But the two concepts are very closely related because both technically deal with making assumptions about a group based on what is observed or said of only a part of the group. Consequently, it is really difficult to distinguish generalizations from stereotypes. If the idea is completely disproven by evidence but is based on what was, at some point, popular belief, then it is most obviously a stereotype. If the idea is a conclusion that can be reached by making an inference based on a part of certain group, then it is a generalization.
    3. In order to combat jumping to false conclusions, we can frequently expose ourselves to contradictions of these gut feelings. For example, if our gut feeling is to cross over to the other side of the street when we see an individual of African-American descent walking towards us, we should expose ourselves to African-Americans who are successful and contradict our negative stereotypes of African-Americans. If we do this frequently enough, we will become used to the idea that not all African-Americans are delinquents.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vaskia, 3A

      I agree with Obichi that the test may not have been valid because of the determining factors, a test should not be based on how fast or slow someone can respond to the question. Maybe the quickness or fastness is due to how well we are able to type or process the information and depending on how we are influenced not only by the people around us but my the media and other influential sources. I never thought of generalization and stereotypes in this way as Obichi has. It has made me realize that although people can make stereotype comments they cannot draw a valid conclusion from it about everyone, but for a generalization one is able to come up with a drawn conclusion based on what they see and know about a group of people. I think it is a good idea to try and combat ourselves from jumping to false conclusions by surrounding ourselves in a different environment that allows us to be able to be use to both sides of the culture shock we often do not face.

      Delete
  18. Nnedi
    3A

    I feel as though these tests have validity, but to a certain extent. When I did the mandated test, I kept pressing the wrong button on accident. I got the wrong answer for something I knew and it might have hindered my results. If I paid close attention, my results would have altered. When I first saw my results, I questioned the test’s validity. The test proved a point, but I was unable to make it as accurate as possible. Some of the cultural messages that may support attitudes linking a dominant group in my nation with positive attributes can be the Caucasian population. The United States history reveals this attributes through various historical occurrences such as the Civil Rights Movement and slavery. Society viewed African Americans as worthless and inferior due to the color of their skin. It did not seem natural to them and race was the factor in daily rituals. In educational settings, we associate racial segregation with the Jim Crow laws and it can affect how we perceive the Caucasian population. Past historical occurrences affect our perception. Because of this, cultural messages are sent to both ethnic groups. Some businesses value race and use it as a way to determine intellect. Other businesses value intellect and undermine the importance of race. Apart from race, people in society may perceive obesity as a hindrance, whereas physical fitness is a good practice. Obesity can be the cause of death although some people think that having a little more fat than other shows how secure they are. These attitudes can be considered generalizations, but not necessarily stereotypes. Generalizations can be distinguished from stereotypes from its projected audience. Generalizations usually target an entire audience. An example can be all girls drink juice. On the other hand, stereotypes target a specific audience, such as Africans and Asians. A common stereotype I hear is that Nigerians engage in 419 or Asians cannot speak English. If some of our consciously held beliefs, attitudes and values are undermined by rapid cognition, we can combat jumping into false conclusions by taking the time to analyze our decision. We should check our assumptions before solely using it to create controversy. Assuming information can mislead the audience and lead to false conclusions. This is why we should limit the amount of assumptions we have regarding an issue before stereotyping others.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ashley

      I completely agree with Nnedi, we do tend to associate or segregate things into specific categories because of out past experiences and our history. We continue with these customs because it is what we are used to, it hard to break bad habits. Like the example she gave about the association of African Americans and bad, with Caucasian and good. Our nation has a huge discrimination problem and racism. The problem still exists today. Based off of our history people would associate african american with bad because of slavery and Jim crow laws etc. Because of race playing such a significant role in our nation, race is a very large component into us, or business people determining who gets the job. They would look at the self worth in race because that is what we are so used to. I also agree with Nnedis distinction between generalization and stereotyping. Generalization is not as necessarily bad as stereotyping. Like she said Stereotyping is directed to particular audience were generalization is to a general wide variety audience.

      Delete
  19. Vaskia, 3A
    These test do not seem valid at first because they are not actual test question rather its as simulation in which is testing one's comprehension of whether or not the best fit with a large group or small group based on the pleasant and unpleasant words, for the Race IAT test, I was able to figure out that I was a moderate african American. For the self-esteem IAT test it was actually question that pertained to my self-esteem then afterwards I had to do the same type of testing in which I would choose if a word wa good or bad to determine my own self-esteem. I was okay with my results for the first first test, because I am okay with interacting with a large amount of people other times small amounts. For the second test I may have questioned the results because, you may think you know yourself and how you are at other times a computer can tell you how you are as a person, may not seem real or believable at first. In my culture, I come from a large family background in which we learn how to become friendly and interact with people outside of my culture. People often times assume that most jamaicans still have a accent and think that every sentence spoken has to include the word "mon". This is false not everyone still has a thick accent, depending on how long they were in their home island and when they left. Other stereotypes are due to the color of our skin and if on has a certain type of hair or not. If someone has dreads then they are often classified as being an African American or in my case a Jamaican. There is not really a difference between generalization and stereotypes. Stereotypes are those that which people automatically assumed. As well as generalizations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vaskia, 3A
      (Continued)

      To some extent we can try to stop ourselves from jumping to conclusions. It is in out norm or human nature to jump to conclusions because of the way we were brought up due to the different influences around us. People are often time judgmental based on either what their parent or the society they live in has taught them. I personally am judgmental, just as most human beings are. I make stereotypical statements about people as they do to me. We maybe able to stop ourselves from saying judgmental things, but sometimes do it unconsciously without thinking first.

      Delete
  20. Stanley, 3A
    - I do think that these tests were valid, but only to the extent of how seriously the test taker was about taking the test. If the test taker was following the rules set aside for the test, then accurate results can be gathered. On the other hand, if the test taker is randomly selecting answers and not consciously doing so, then inaccurate results can be born. When I first saw my results, I accepted them because they had a large probability to be true. Society gives African Americans a negative connotation and therefore it may have reflected in my results. There are many movies and shows that portray African Americans as a negative and ghetto ethnic group. For example “Boyz in the Hood” is a move of all African Americans who find it hard to escape the “street life” and are scary characters. In order to combat jumping to false conditions, we must not pass on our prejudice to te next generation. Peoples personal prejudice are ones that are hard to escape from and they might stay with us for the rest of our lives, however if we stop passing of prejudice to the younger generation, we can combat its existence in the future.



    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jemuel
      I completely agree with Stanley's post. The amount of focus the person gave to the test will definitely have an impact on its result. If a person gave all of his/her attention to the test, the result will be more accurate to how the person actually thinks or feels. I also believe that society has given African Americans a bad reputation therefore people are more inclined to link them with bad words. Our generation will most likely keep this type of connotation but if we slowly get rid of this way of thinking, the next generation or the one after that may become different from us.

      Delete
  21. Sunny 3A


    My first reaction to this article i thought that it was a joke and wasn't a serious article. Knowing that it is i believe I'm not the one to judge him or his friend. if thats what he wants to praise and believe that is him as long as it is not dealing with me or hurting me. This Article connects with the story of umbrellogy and the study of it. If it was a true science. Both articles have the details for it. And it connects to the reason chapters for the finder. Deductive reasoning would be one example the title talks about him about wearing a pasta strainer then gets in detail about why.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for posting!!

Swift