Monday, April 8, 2013

Essay L by Sir Francis Bacon

Decide what two sentences are the most thought-provoking to you and explain your thinking.

Post your comment below by Thursday (4/11/13) morning:

Anonymous
First Name Only

Essay L of Studies by Sir Francis Bacon




STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight is in privateness and retiring; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business. For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one; but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs, come best from those that are learned. To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar. They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience. Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation. Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books, else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Abeunt studia in mores [Studies pass into and influence manners]. Nay, there is no stond or impediment in the wit but may be wrought out by fit studies; like as diseases of the body may have appropriate exercises. Bowling is good for the stone and reins; shooting for the lungs and breast; gentle walking for the stomach; riding for the head; and the like. So if a man’s wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the Schoolmen; for they are cymini sectores [splitters of hairs]. If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study the lawyers’ cases. So every defect of the mind may have a special receipt. 

24 comments:

  1. Jessica:

    “They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience.”

    “To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar.”

    These two sentences were most thought-provoking for me because I was able to contemplate about the need for balance in ones life. Although studies are important, we have to put them to use, to become more well-rounded individuals. The second statement leads me to think Sir Francis Bacon brought forth that judgments may be require our way of knowing emotion, not just “rules,” which I believe mean logic and reason deducted from studies. I also remember the saying “Practice makes perfect” in reading the first statement, if we don’t practice or put what we learn to use, we’ll forget it and have a missing link in our understanding of the big picture that our studies are supposed to help us get closer to. I believe we are to use what we learn in the real world. If we don’t, it’s as good as a fantasy. Studies help form a stronger base for wisdom we may attain from experience, but becoming immersed in studies will not instantly make us wise, or put us higher than other people. Even in college acceptance, they start to look at an applicants’ other attributes, besides their success in studies. They look at them applying themselves in the real world, such as community service and sports. A well rounded person is much more ready for the world than one solely dependent on studies.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The two most thought provoking sentences to me are

    1.To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar.

    2.If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study the lawyers’ cases. So every defect of the mind may have a special receipt.

    I chose sentence number one because it shows the cons of studying. Its showed me that you cannot be focused to much on studies all the time because you have to be well rounded in other aspects of life. The sentence also teaches that you be most wise or knowledgeable person but you can't just take advantage of other people who are less knowledgeable. Knowledge is power but it should be used as good instead of evil.Studying can also go your head where you don't be open minded is also what I learned from the sentence.

    I thought sentence two was thought provoking also because it gives people reason not to give up on themselves. It teaches you if your struggling with something than you can improve on it. For example the Ben Carson story in which he was called dumb in elementary school but he persevere and was able to improve his grades to go Yale despite being called dumb. Improving your weakness sometimes be your way to success.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The two most thought provoking sentences to me are

    1.To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar.

    2.If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study the lawyers’ cases. So every defect of the mind may have a special receipt.

    I chose sentence number one because it shows the cons of studying. Its showed me that you cannot be focused to much on studies all the time because you have to be well rounded in other aspects of life. The sentence also teaches that you be most wise or knowledgeable person but you can't just take advantage of other people who are less knowledgeable. Knowledge is power but it should be used as good instead of evil.Studying can also go your head where you don't be open minded is also what I learned from the sentence.

    I thought sentence two was thought provoking also because it gives people reason not to give up on themselves. It teaches you if your struggling with something than you can improve on it. For example the Ben Carson story in which he was called dumb in elementary school but he persevere and was able to improve his grades to go Yale despite being called dumb. Improving your weakness sometimes be your way to success.

    --Guyvin

    I forgot to put my name on the other one

    ReplyDelete
  4. Romance

    "Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation."
    -This was thought provoking because it explained all that you gain from studies. Basically the creative creates them,the simple admires and the wise uses them. Studies only show one side,typically a generalization based off of observations, so those who believe are considered simple because everyone is of different to be generalized.

    "Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider"
    -Studies resemble history. You must be open minded in order to learn from the study, but as in relation to my first quote you still should believe them. Its up to you to decide whether or not you choose to follow of learn from the study.

    ReplyDelete
  5. a) For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one; but the general counsels, and the plots and marshaling of affairs, come best from those that are learned.
    b) They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience.
    The above two sentences go hand in hand somehow and to me the first one explains that a person can be a master or an “expert” in a particular field or just any given thing and could know and understand it from top to bottom and could judge it from either sides but at the end of the day in order to fully grasp and understand something one has to be learned. Learned in the sense that you have to be educated in more than one thing and go beyond being just educated but fully knowing something so that it is fully engraved in you especially when it comes to proper judgment. It’s never enough to just know but once you are able to apply it and be learned in it, it puts you in an upper hand than just being an “expert” in it.
    The second sentence talks about how it’s important to have a balance between studies and being able to integrate experience into it. As it says, studies perfect nature and in return are perfected by experience. There is only so much one can do with studies but to be able to balance it with everyday life socially and experience wise, creates a perfect balance. It’s the whole idea of street smart and book smart, you need a little of both.

    --Jayeon--

    ReplyDelete
  6. Esther :

    Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation. Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider.

    This was thought-provoking for me it me realize that we studies show contrary to their philosophic they are not of acceptance,and try to find claim.Simple say what the studies states and go along with it.But WISE MAN take the studies analyze to see where they are wrong and change habits and to educate other. If one cannot recognize fault they will not be able to move on. When presented with a new theory one should make people take this certain actions by taking with friends.looks for counterclaims.view as true,and don't recognized. I think of the Study saying that smoking can cause one to have lung cancer some quit smoking others too the information and stop at time an continue but when they at the age of sixty they wondering why the having cancer.Studies help one,and can be true to an extent.

    ReplyDelete
  7. "Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider."

    I picked this quote because I strongly agree with it. One shouldn't read to go against it, but to learn from it. It also doesn't necessarily mean that you have to take the things that you read as absolute truth. We learn to better ourselves as a people and to grow personally. We have to take what we read and ingest it but know that books aren't always the only source of knowledge. I believe that life is the overall teacher and reading helps facilitate that. Reading overall is a great source of knowledge that we take in and learn from.

    "To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar."

    This quote makes believe that there is no such thing as a perfect scholar (which there isn't) Bacon said that studying too much is bad and studying for the wrong reasons is bad as well. Making judgments strictly based on facts isn't always the best as well. We are humans and operate from our different WOKs. For example making decisions just based on reasoning can limit our decision making. We need all of our WOKs in order to weigh things out and make the best decisions. With knowledge, solely relying on it doesn't make you a well-rounded person at all.

    ReplyDelete
  8. "Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider."

    I picked this quote because I strongly agree with it. One shouldn't read to go against it, but to learn from it. It also doesn't necessarily mean that you have to take the things that you read as absolute truth. We learn to better ourselves as a people and to grow personally. We have to take what we read and ingest it but know that books aren't always the only source of knowledge. I believe that life is the overall teacher and reading helps facilitate that. Reading overall is a great source of knowledge that we take in and learn from.

    "To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar."

    This quote makes believe that there is no such thing as a perfect scholar (which there isn't) Bacon said that studying too much is bad and studying for the wrong reasons is bad as well. Making judgments strictly based on facts isn't always the best as well. We are humans and operate from our different WOKs. For example making decisions just based on reasoning can limit our decision making. We need all of our WOKs in order to weigh things out and make the best decisions. With knowledge, solely relying on it doesn't make you a well-rounded person at all.
    -Ihu (forgot to put name before I posted the last one)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Michael:

    “Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider.” --Sir Francis Bacon

    This sentence is significant because Bacon is warning us that the only true purpose of reading is “to weigh and consider”. This sentence is also significant because it show us what people have been doing wrong for, possibly, hundreds of years. When people read articles they don’t agree with, they are quick to find anything wrong with the arguments these articles present. Then, they claim that these articles (or anything else people read) are wrong solely because of these “flaws”. For thousands of years, people have blindly believed whatever they read from religious texts (especially the Christian Bible) and have ignorantly took them for granted, as well. People, if they read something that can be talked about, will even find faults in what they read and have discussions that criticize whatever they read (especially if whatever they read conflicts with their beliefs). According to Bacon, what people should actually be doing whenever they are reading is weighing what they read with either other things they have already read or with their beliefs and considering what they have just read really means.

    “Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.” --Sir Francis Bacon

    This sentence is also significant because here Bacon speaks to an important fact: books vary tremendously in how they can be read. While I was spending last summer at Harvard University, my 20th Century Literature teacher once said that books with exciting plots are relatively thin in content, while books with somewhat duller plots are much thicker in content. He was somewhat echoing what Bacon has also said: some books should be “read, but not curiously” (because those books have an exciting plot with little content), while others should be “read wholly” (because those books have duller plots that are rich in content). My current World Literature teacher has also said that some shorter books are harder to analyze than books that are longer. Again, this echoes what Bacon said: some books should be read “non-curiously” (due to their shorter length, which limits how much content they can contain and how deeply they can be analyzed), while others must be read “with diligence and attention” (due to their longer length, which means that these books are full of analyzable content).

    ReplyDelete
  10. "For natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study"
    "Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them"

    I thought these two phrases were the most thought provoking. The first one led me to think of the importance of staying acute. I thought about the need for hard work and practice in order to develop natural talent. It is clear Bacon thinks that natural skill can take you but so far especially in knowledge where it is continuously changing. The second sentence made me think of the impact the way of knowing perception has on our value of knowledge. Those who are ignorant often praise those with knowledge because they are often the leaders. I also thought it was interesting how the crafty disliked knowledge. I thought it was because those with knowledge can see pass there schemes. It made me think about the difference in value of knowledge in social classes.
    ~Brittney

    ReplyDelete
  11. ~Jasmine BW

    "To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar."

    "Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider."

    The first sentence was though provoking for me because it depicts a reason why many things should be done or used in moderation. Spending too much time with studies is sloth because the knowledge you acquire from those studies are not being out to use. If a person constantly reads but never tried to apply the information to real life then they could be considered sloth. Using studies or books for ornaments shows affection because it expresses the importance of books and learning on your life and the pride someone can receive from reading them.

    The second sentence was interesting to me because it shows why wise people read and why they are considered wise. Books are pieces of work created by other people for education, entertainment, or persuasive purposes. Reading should be use to broaden a persons knowledge on the subject and the perspective the author is portraying. As people, we should not use readings to base our knowledge or beliefs, but to consider why they were created. What value does the text have and how does it connect to the world?

    ReplyDelete
  12. "Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider."

    "But to weigh and consider". This phrase in itself describes how learning truly is supposed to be, which is from the self and not from those that impose information on you. This reminds me of my prescribed title where I made the distinct differentiation between knowledge and understanding: knowledge is sheer, unharnessed information, where the application of this knowledge truly begets understanding. Do not read, or gain information, solely for the reason to contradict what the instructor is telling you. This has no benefit to you nor those that make attempts to teach you. Do not blindly read, or learn, and regurgitate every lesson, every idea that is thrown toward you. You do not truly learn anything, rather memorization of what others believe. This reason of reading, or learning, makes one stop at the level of knowledge, preventing them from rising to true understanding. It is true understanding that enables us as people to become true learners and knowers. By reading only to find something to believe in, rather than developing that feeling by yourself, you lose yourself to greater extents. It is only the final version of reading and learning that Bacon emphasizes on that allows us to truly reach understanding. You "weigh" the information given to you, deciding what you truly agree with, what truly goes against or with your own personal morals and beliefs. You do not go against everything you see, nor do you agree with it. With your own personal identity, you forge your own version of understanding, true understanding, something that Bacon exemplifies amazingly.

    --JoshA.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I thought these quotes were fascinating because of the way the words were arranged which made it more interesting, and pushed readers to think more about its meaning; it sounds so philosophical, of course, Sir Francis Bacon was a philosopher.

    The first quote was “Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested”. This quote reminds me of the different types of books one could read. The part of the quote that says “some books are to be tasted” reminds me of fiction books because it isn't supposed to be taken literally and some people read it for just entertainment; there are benefits of reading fiction books, but it isn't supposed to be taken as truth therefore it is just tasted and not swallowed, or digested. The next part of this quote, “others to be swallowed” reminds me of factual books such as geography books and atlas’; those books are usually correct especially when updated, and one shouldn't contemplate on its validity too much. The last part of the quote I think means that there are certain books or even documents that one should question. When we chew we take something apart into its true essence, and by doing this to a book, we are analyzing it for further understanding; we digest when necessary and we might just purge what we think is invalid and incorrect.

    The second quote was “Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man”. This quote shows me that education was extremely important during that time period, and the very important people were always the educated, which tended to be those with wealth and power. I think Sir Bacon was saying that reading makes aware person; when one is constantly reading, it can give them understanding of different points of view and by that they can obtain knowledge. Then the last part of the quote says “writing an exact man”, and I think that this means that one who writes can better express their views, therefore reading and writing works hand-in-hand to make a full man. But this makes me question Sir Bacon’s view of those who do not read and write, but possess great knowledge, then what is the standpoint for the man that is “full” because he reads.

    ~Linda E.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Traje'

    Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation.

    - I choose this sentence because it stood out to mean. I believed this sentence was very thought provoking. It interests me when people like make comparisons or basically judge a person by its cover. I can really explain it but like for example a smart person does...., but a wealthy person does this.... Those catch my eye because sometimes I wonder how do you came up with such a statement? How do you know that a simple man might want to use it? Wise men might just want to admire it. I would just like to know what reasoning one has behind their statements. WHy is Crafty men contemn reliable? I never heard of them (even though i dont keep up on this stuff). THere are always limitations in ones studies.

    "Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention."

    -The way that Sir Francis Bacon make "comparsions" ( idont think thats the right word im looking for) its really catching and keeps me intrigued. IT makes me think about, because of the way that he wrote this essay and his choose of words, its up to me to anaylze and disect exactly what bhe is trying to say. Being in mr. adams class, in which wwe dissect just about very paragraph i have learned to anaylze the text instead of read and not understand. with Sir Francis Bacon writing you have to dig deeper with the words than to stay on the surface. When i read the irst part of that sentence the first thing that came to my mind was though books are not to be eaten, they probably taste nasty. But i then realized that what he wrote was not literal. Some books you have to go into depth in order to understand them.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Nathaniel

    1. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.

    2. Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider.

    I like these two sentences the most in the essay because I immediately saw important messages within them. The message in the first quote I believe is saying that everyone changes for the good due to reading. When it said conference I thought of the people in our government and the worlds leaders. I believe if they read and comprehend what's going on more then they will be more ready and prepared for the things to come in the future. Also, I agree that if we read more than our writing will get better. So, I liked this quote because I agreed with it. The message in the second quote to me is saying that we should only read to think about ourselves and the things we should do. I liked this quote because I think we shouldn't read to scorn or judge and we definitely shouldn't believe everything we hear and read.

    ReplyDelete
  16. *Stella Bella:

    Two thought-provoking sentences: "Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention."

    I was intrigued by the first sentence because it gave guidance. It's telling us to read for understanding, to be aware and acknowledge. This sentence first goes to tell us what are intentions should not be when reading (although these are found commonly among the people). The purpose of reading and obtaining knowledge should not be to go against it, believe aimlessly, or to use as a support within a feud. This sentence makes me wonder where I lie in reading. Do I read to better myself? Or do I read and do nothing with it?

    The following sentence also caught my eye because it discloses value of certain books. This sentence does not discriminate against books but it does disclose how we should pay more attention to certain books more than others. The way the level of comprehension was synonymous with a stage of eating was interesting. The body gets the full amount of nutrition from the food if it is chewed and digested rather than receiving just a taste. The mind benefits the most when the book is read diligently and in its entirety rather than read just a few chapters. This question makes me think which books show I read more of or pay closer attention to? Are the pieces information that I'm obtaining beneficial enough and worth chewing and digesting? Or am I reading bits an pieces of the proper works that should be savored?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Selena

    "They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience."
    "Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation."

    These two sentences were the most thought provoking to me because they talked about how to use and apply knowledge. Many times we gain knowledge from books or in class but do not apply them to our daily lives. Sometimes we may keep the academic and social portions of ourselves separate when in actuality they should be intertwined. This is why learning can only truly be perfected through experience. Our human nature includes a need to learn and grow. Through doing this we are self actualizing and perfecting ourselves. However I don't necessarily believe that knowledge can be "bounded in by experience". I believe that our experience expands our knowledge.Through living we discover the world around us; but we also discover ourselves; In doing so we unearth the true wisdom that is within us. In the second quote he compares three types of men. Crafty men would contemn knowledge because it makes it harder for them to play you. Knowledge to them is a game that they can play to their advantage bu they never use it or themselves to their full potential; They never reach their perfection. Simple men admire knowledge because it may seem out of their grasp. This makes them simple because they see its true power bu never try to gain it. Therefore they never reach their own form of perfection. A wise man uses knowledge because he sees its it true power and uses it to reach his own perfection. Watching the world and people around you can give you an idea about yourself. Once gathering these ideas you can reach a wisdom greater that you imagined. In conclusion our natural abilities are perfect when we are the best self that we can be. When we reach this state we have also reached great wisdom because we can connect all forms of knowledge and use these forms to reach our highest aptitude; as well as being able to look within ourselves and others to see both perfection and imperfection.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Junior
    They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience.
    My thinking behind this is that, only experience can improve something. In order to improve on a subject, you must study it and become knowledgeable.
    Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation.
    I like this statement best. My understanding of it is that crafty men do not appreciate or like studying. Simple minded people see and admire their ability to find the easy way out and that wise men use the crafty man’s ability against him. This reminds me of the music business, more specifically rappers. They are crafty men that have adoring fan bases but yet are taking advantage of daily by record companies and managers. Most of these rappers get cheated because they lack the knowledge to detect it.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Elijah
    Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider.

    Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.

    I found these sentences the most thought provoking because they are both interesting views on the purpose of studying and reading. The first sentence made me think of school and why I study and read things there. I read and study not for myself and to basically prove to others that I have a general understanding of what is being taught.So I guess what attracted me most to this sentence was the fact that I was trying to see what category I fell under in it.
    I picked the second sentence because Sir Francis Bacon seemed to give every book or piece of literature worth. No where in that statement did it say there were books that were not to be read or explored. This made me think back to when I was reading Mein Kampf a book most people wouldn't consider worth reading.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Posting for Kayla

    Kayla:

    "Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested;"
    "They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience"

    These two quotes were the most thought provoking to me. In the first sentence, I thought it was interesting because of the comparison between books and eating. I agree with the statement because it describes how we research. When we research, we look for different books that we can analyze. Some books can spark ideas ( you're tasting), some books you just read it but get nothing from it (you're swallowing), and finally you have the books that are good enough to be digest, and fully looked into. This way you can gain information and knowledge.

    The second quote to me, is similar to the phrase practice makes perfect. I think it is in reference to scientists because it talks about nature. They find new and better ways to make the environment better, and this experience ends up making them better in their field. Learning is not the only step to success. You have to take what you know and apply it to something. With experience you know what you are doing, and you won't make the same mistakes you once made.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Posting for Jazmine

    Jazmine:
    My interpretation of this essay was that Sir Francis Bacon was stressing the importance of applying skills we learn to life. Knowledge is nothing if it is not used correctly.
    " Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider."
    this quote stuck out to me because he is basically saying don't read just because or to have something to talk about, read to truly analyze what the words mean and how they apply to you and your life. We don't learn things just for the sake of learning we learn so that we are better prepared for the things we experience in life and many people miss that point.

    ReplyDelete
  22. LOVELY

    Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation. Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. These two sentences are the most thought-provoking to me. They strike me the most. Majorly, it's because it made me think about the differences between people in society, academically or education-wise. "Crafty men contemn studies," are (to me) interpreted as those people who use knowledge based from their experiences. They live by their own history; past and present experiences to make their future. Somewhat, it sounds like ignorance because of they solely depend on their own; makes them biased. However, they can't be judged either if that's the way they live their lives because, maybe, those experiences they live by are the "studies" to them. Some people's experiences are so intense that they learn so much from them. However, learning from their mistakes would have been better with real "studies," education-wise, because of facts from professionals and even to learn from how others handled similar experiences. Thus, allows them to be open-minded as well. "Simple men admire them," sounds more of something mediocre. Interpretation of this phrase would be people who are in the middle of obtaining knowledge. They are people that think about these studies whether it is applicable to their own lives. They compare and contrast the reliance of these studies. However, they are unlike "wise men" since "simple men" sounds more of people that go with what's already here. They use resources according to what they are supposed to use for. For example, a "simple man" in this context maybe a nurse, working accordingly to the expectations and stereotypes of a nurse: to work in only in a hospital, day and night, to help ill-patients, assist them and the doctors. However, as oppose to a nurse that is a "wise man" in this context, he/she would relinquish such stereotypes in ways of going into missions in different places in the world, such as in Africa where nurses are definitely, extremely in need. So, a "wise man" in this context, goes beyond the default. The "studies" are used as weapons and defense for future situations; to fight against adversities when present, in order to make themselves successful paths. Thus, they use their education in many different ways and not just in ways where they are in subjection to. Otherwise, without this education, they would not be wise.

    "Read … to weigh and consider," is the other sentence that definitely strikes me the most. Sir Francis Bacon was in commencement of introducing the real purpose of reading, at least wisely. The context of "to weigh and consider [reading]" in other words is to analyze the quality of the reading. Whether it is useful

    ReplyDelete
  23. Lovely pt 2

    for many purposes and how heavy its quality can be for applicability and accuracy of validating facts. "Consider [reading]" is to basically evaluate for applicability for what purposes. When Sir Francis Bacon warns of what reading is not for such as "contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse," he reminds that some people use this reading for the wrong motives, or when people use them for such ways, it makes it look like they are used for the wrong motives. Because sometimes we tend to believe in what we read, hence we apply them in our actions, yet we contradict. For example, in the bible, there are many sets of instructions and reminders of what and how a Christian should be. Christians believe what it says and applies it to their lives, but sometimes they make actions that are contradictory towards these commands from the bible. Thus, creates hypocrisy in the Christian community. On the other hand, some may take the word of the bible to defend themselves against others; to justify the that what is considered sin by others, is not sin. Philosophers, on the other hand, may tend to "find talk and discourse," basically judge what it says. However, to avoid circumstances such these, Sir Francis Bacon is reminding the wise purposes of reading.

    ReplyDelete
  24. 1.) They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience.
    2.) To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar.

    These two sentences stuck out to me the most due to many reasons. The first sentence talks about how we grow and what we need to grow and prosper in society and grow as a human being. The sentence uses a metaphor to describe human ability to grow to a plant that also grows. We need the basic necessities to live and continue growing. Experiences are used to display how we learn, analyze, and observe who we are and how our surroundings impact us. This sentence allows me to think about the different things human beings go through to grow and move on; the most obvious point is experiences. He used experience to show that there are two types of people, two types of reasoning, and two types of perspectives. For instance, person 1 is the individual who is bound to learn from experiences, and completely depends on his/her experiences to continue living and observing what’s moral. Person 2 is the individual who may not depend on experiences to influence their lives. These individuals may believe they lack experiences, because they depend on other matters to show their lives and progression.

    The second sentence seems to connect to sentence one to an extent. The writer says that learning from studies turn into a lazy existence, because experience seems to be lacking. If someone is too smart, they seems to become arrogant and use that skill as doll to embody who they are to themselves and to society. I’ve seen many individuals that connect their lives and every study, situation and living experiences to a text book term or prior knowledge. The lack of personal reflection and/or observations of experiences allows them to connect everything to knowledge. As he says “to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar.” If we make judgments only by the perception of rules and what books always say, then our personal bias and perception is clouded. This overall becomes an issue, because we don’t depend on our ways of thinking to influence what we say or write, and overall jades our own perception and mindsets in the world.

    These two sentences are very interesting to me and stick out due to their connections about experiences and learning, which to me overlap in any circumstance in life.

    Franklin

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for posting!!

Swift